The Siphon Experiment

The Siphon Experiment - Fluid Mechanics Winter 2008 San...

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Unformatted text preview: Fluid Mechanics Winter 2008 San Jose State University Introduction History Principles of Siphoning The Experiment Approach Analysis Results Overview Applications Question and Answer Conclusion History www.wikipedia.org Principles of Siphoning Just How Do Siphons Work? Siphon used to bring a liquid from a given vessel (A) over an intermediate level (B) to a lower vessel (C) When both legs of the siphon are full, the hydrostatic force due to gravity is larger on the longer leg (hc), thus causing the liquid to move up the shorter leg (hb) over the bend (B), and down the longer leg. Siphon Schematic www.wikipedia.org The Experiment Approach 1. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Material List 2. 3. 4. 5. Establish a base understanding of how a siphon works Determine the goal of the experiment Perform experiment with two different fluids with varying heights of each Compare the results 3/8" ID clear aquarium tubing Start and end vessels Fluids: Water and Cooking Oil Tape Measure Stop Watch Experiment Goal Perform a practical application of the equations studied in the classroom to determine the inlet pressure achieved when siphoning. Governing Equation p1 V12 p2 V22 + + z1 = + + z2 2g 2g The Experiment Start Vessel 3/8" ID Clear Tube End Vessel Test Platform Typical Test Set Up Test Fluid The Experiment Test 1: h = 21.5 in Fluid = Water, = 62.4 lb/ft Test 2: h = 32.25 in Fluid = Water , = 62.4 lb/ft The Experiment Test 3: h = 30 in Fluid = Cooking Oil , = ?? lb/ft Test 4: h = 40.75 in Fluid = Cooking Oil , = ?? lb/ft Results Fluid = Water Run 1 Height (Z1) Height (Z2) Height Difference Time Volume Q (SI) Q (English) 23.50 inches 45.00 inches 21.50 inches 33.30 seconds 2.00 liters 0.0601 liters/s 3.6649 inches3/2 Run 2 Height (Z1) Height (Z2) Height Difference Time Volume Q (SI) Q (English) 12.75 inches 45.00 inches 32.25 inches 32.80 seconds 2.00 liters 0.0610 liters/s 3.7207 inches3/2 Diameter Velocity Inlet Pressure 0.3750 inches 33.1991 inches/s 1.8923 psi Diameter Velocity Inlet Pressure 0.3750 inches 33.7051 inches/s 6.3225 psi Results Fluid = Cooking Oil Run 3 Height (Z1) Height (Z2) Height Difference Time Volume Q (SI) Q (English) 23.50 inches 53.50 inches 30.00 inches 170.00 seconds 1.40 liters 0.0082 liters/s 0.5025 inches3/2 Run 4 Height (Z1) Height (Z2) Height Difference Time Volume Q (SI) Q (English) 12.75 inches 53.50 inches 40.75 inches 145.00 seconds 1.40 liters 0.0097 liters/s 0.5892 inches3/2 Diameter Velocity Inlet Pressure 0.3750 inches 4.5522 inches/s 11.7476 psi Diameter Velocity Inlet Pressure 0.3750 inches 5.3370 inches/s 15.9552 psi Conclusion What did we learn? The greater the difference in height between the first and second legs of the siphon, the greater the inlet pressure For a siphon to occur naturally, leg 2 must be longer than leg 1 For higher viscosity values, the greater the inlet pressure Real life results achieved from classroom knowledge. Leg 1 Leg 2 Applications Everyday uses of siphons www.wikipedia.org Questions? ...
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