week8post - I chose to do two exercises for this week's...

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I chose to do two exercises for this week’s post, so the first I will discuss is exercise #16, even though it was not assigned, “All students at this school pay tuition. Some people who pay tuition at this school will fail. So some students at this school will fail.” First, I will need to rewrite the argument in standard form of a categorical syllogism and identify the form, and then check whether it is valid or not. Epstein defines a categorical syllogism as, “an argument composed of three categorical claims (two premises and a conclusion. The three claims use three terms as subject or predicate, each of which appears in exactly two of the claims.” (381) The argument in standard form of categorical syllogism is as follows: Premise 1- All students at this school pay tuition. Premise 2- Some people who pay tuition at this school will fail. Conclusion- So some students at this school will fail. I used a decision table to figure out that the two claims are subcontrary, meaning that there is no possible way for them to both be false. I have determined that the categorical syllogism is valid by inspecting its form. When the claim is in standard form,
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week8post - I chose to do two exercises for this week's...

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