When_to_Cite_Yale_Writing_Center

When_to_Cite_Yale_Writing_Center - From the Yale College...

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From the Yale College Writing Center (http://www.yale.edu/bass/writing/sources/plagiarism/warning.html) “Warning: When You Must Cite Although you should use sources creatively and flexibly to help you generate ideas and sharpen your argument, there are some hard-and-fast rules about the way sources should be acknowledged in your project. Click on the links for more explanation of the various rules. ALWAYS CITE, in the following cases: 1) When you quote two or more words verbatim, or even one word if it is used in a way that is unique to the source. Explanation 2) When you introduce facts that you have found in a source. Explanation 3) When you paraphrase or summarize ideas, interpretations, or conclusions that you find in a source. For more explanation, see Fair Paraphrase . 4) When you introduce information that is not common knowledge or that may be considered common knowledge in your field, but the reader may not know it. For more information, see Common Knowledge . 5) When you borrow the plan or structure of a larger section of a source’s argument (for example, using a theory from a source and analyzing the same three case studies that the source uses). Explanation 6) When you build on another’s method found either in a source or from collaborative work in a lab. Explanation 7) When you build on another’s program in writing computer code or on a not-commonly-known algorithm. Explanation 8) When you collaborate with others in producing knowledge. Explanation ALWAYS CITE, in the following cases:
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1) When you quote two or more words verbatim, or even one word if it is used in a way that is unique to the source. Most writers realize that they must acknowledge a source when quoting a memorable phrase or sentence. They’d be sure to credit Mark Twain when quoting: “The coldest winter I ever spent was a summer in San Francisco.” And you probably also understand that you do not need to cite words that are very common to your topic. When writing about Hamlet, you do not need to put the words “Hamlet” or “Shakespeare” in quotation marks, or cite a
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When_to_Cite_Yale_Writing_Center - From the Yale College...

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