Heloise - faint image of himself, to draw some comfort. But...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
On the Fame of Abelard HELOISE Twelfth century LETTER  of consolation you had written to a Mend,  my dearest Abelard, was lately as by chance  put into my hands. The superscription in a moment told me  from whom it came, and the sentiments I felt for the  writer compelled me to read it more eagerly. . I had  lost the reality; I hoped therefore from his words, a  faint  image of himself, to draw some comfort. But  alas! for I well remember it, almost every line was  marked with  gall and wormwood. It related the  lamentable story of our conversion, and the long list  of your own unabated sufferings. Indeed, you amply fulfilled the promises you there  made to your friend, that, in comparison of your  own, is misfortunes should appear as nothing, or  as light as air. Having exposed the persecutions you had  suffered from your masters, and the cruel deed of my  uncle, you  were naturally led to a recital of the  hateful and invidious conduct of Albericus of Reims,  and Lotulphus of Lombardy. By their suggestions,  your admirable work on the Trinity was condemned  to   the   flames,   and   yourself   were   thrown   into  confinement. This you did not omit to mention. The  machinations of the abbot of St. Denys and of your  false brethren are there brought forward; but chiefly —for   from   them   you   had   most   to  suffer—the  calumnious aspersions of those false apostles, Norbert  and Bernard, whom envy had roused against you. It was even, you say, imputed as a crime to you to  have given the name of Paraclete, contrary to the  common practice, to the oratory you had erected. In  fine, the incessant persecutions of that cruel tyrant  of St. Gildas, and of those execrable monks, whom  yet you  call your children and to which at this  moment you are exposed, close the melancholy tale  of a life of sorrow. Who, think you, could read or hear these things  and  not be moved to tears? What then must be my  situation?  The singular precision with which each  event is stated  could but more strongly renew my  sorrows. I was doubly agitated, because I perceived  the tide of danger was still rising against you. Are  A
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
we then to despair of your  life? And must our  breasts, trembling at every sound, be hourly alarmed  by the rumours of that terrible event? For Christ's sake, my Abelard—and He, I trust, as yet  protects you—do inform us, and that repeatedly, of  each
Background image of page 2
8 2 8   T H E H O U S E O F F A M E circumstance of your present dangers. I and my  sisters are the sole remains of all your friends. Let us,  at least,  partake   of  your  joys  and  sorrows.   The 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 13

Heloise - faint image of himself, to draw some comfort. But...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online