Morality and the Good Life III

Morality and the Good Life III - Morality and the Good Life...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 9/8/10 Morality and the Good Life Action and Consequences
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9/8/10 Happy St. Patrick's Day!
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9/8/10 Review Virtue, Reason and the Passions: Benedict Spinoza, Ethics For Spinoza, a life of virtue is lived in accordance with our rational nature. Virtue is the very striving for self- preservation, and man’s ability to preserve his existence.
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9/8/10 Review We should seek virtue for its own sake, since there is nothing more important for us than achieving our upmost rational capacity. When we neglect our rational virtues, we expose ourselves to danger of the passions and desires. The passions are external causes, in making us feel and think a certain
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9/8/10 Review “This striving by which the mind, in so far as it reasons, endeavors to preserve its existence, is nothing else but understanding; and hence this striving to understand is the first and only foundation of virtue.” p. 497 “In so far as people are subject to the passions, they cannot be said to be in harmony in their nature.” p. 498
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9/8/10 Review Passions act against human reason and understanding by depriving the mind of knowledge, something lasting and more consistent in nature. Knowledge may not completely remove the emotions, in so far as they are passions, but at least it brings it about that they constitute
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9/8/10 Review Human Feeling as the Source of Ethics: David Hume, Enquiry concerning the Principles of Morals Sentimentalism: We come to know moral truths through our emotions and feelings for others. As Hume illustrates, we might suppose that there are no Reasons in
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9/8/10 Review Hume took a dim view of the power of reason anywhere, especially in ethics. For Hume, reason’s proper sphere is confined to mathematics and logic, while knowledge about the way things are is due solely to sense experience. Human reason has a limited domain.
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9/8/10 Review The heart, or what Hume called passion or sentiment, rules everything. Our passions and sentiments need to operate in the world that we learn about: ignorance is a recipe for acting disastrously, both to ourselves and to others. Unambitious concerns, such as
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Review Sympathy is not mandated by reason alone. The plight of others gives us reasons to act, certainly, but not Reasons. ‘Reason is and ought only to be the
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Morality and the Good Life III - Morality and the Good Life...

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