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otSurveys6 - Surveys The most widely used datagathering...

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    Surveys The most widely used data-gathering  device in sociology
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    Surveys Survey research rests on sampling. A sample is simply the collection of people  from whom you are gathering data.   There are tons of ways to sample, but we  want to be sure that we sample with  generalizabilty  in mind.
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    Surveys What type of sampling does the General Social  Survey use??? In 2004, it was a multistage cluster sample.  It is a  full probability sample of US households, meaning  that each house had an equal chance of being  selected. Persons in households were selected  systematically to make demographic  characteristics of the sample equivalent to the  characteristics of the U.S. population.
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    Surveys What are the implications of the General Social Survey’s  sampling??? The GSS is an adults-only survey of persons in households.   Therefore, it underrepresents: 18 – 24 year-olds (many not living in households—military,  college, roaming) 65 and over (many not living in households—vacations, RVs,  assisted living) Persons who live in large households (only one person per  household is interviewed) Homeless and some poor (not in official households, in  shelters, on streets)
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    Surveys Sampling is a technique for selecting subjects.   So what is a survey? A process of presenting a standard series of questions to a sample  of persons. The purpose is to accurately reflect the beliefs, attitudes, and  behaviors of the sample, so that one can generalize accurate  information to some larger population. The survey is the most widely used technique in sociology because  it is best suited for looking at the complex social world.   To capture  that world accurately, we have to measure it “in situ.”   That  means we must sample from it, and measure many different  phenomena, where they are found naturally.
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    Surveys Types of Surveys: The survey can be administered as a(n): Written document filled out by the sample’s  respondents alone in groups or individually in group settings (group administered) Face-to-face interview, with questions read by an  interviewer Telephone interview Electronic Questionnaire
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    Surveys Survey Delivery: Written Questionnaires: Mail  Group Administered Questionnaires Drop-off Surveys Electronic Questionnaires: Distributed as E-mail Web pages—sampling can be done via normal methods, but  often aren’t Public computers in high-traffic areas In the future:   Files sent via mail, replacing written surveys Mixed formats offered to subjects (choose: pen-and-paper, web page,  file on disk)
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