Steen - http://tpj.sagepub.com The Prison Journal DOI:

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Unformatted text preview: http://tpj.sagepub.com The Prison Journal DOI: 10.1177/0032885507304526 2007; 87; 344 The Prison Journal Sara Steen and Tara Opsal of Parole Revocation in Four States "Punishment on the Installment Plan": Individual-Level Predictors http://tpj.sagepub.com/cgi/content/abstract/87/3/344 The online version of this article can be found at: Published by: http://www.sagepublications.com On behalf of: Pennsylvania Prison Society can be found at: The Prison Journal Additional services and information for http://tpj.sagepub.com/cgi/alerts Email Alerts: http://tpj.sagepub.com/subscriptions Subscriptions: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsReprints.nav Reprints: http://www.sagepub.com/journalsPermissions.nav Permissions: http://tpj.sagepub.com/cgi/content/refs/87/3/344 Citations at SAN JOSE STATE UNIV on April 28, 2010 http://tpj.sagepub.com Downloaded from Punishment on the Installment Plan Individual-Level Predictors of Parole Revocation in Four States Sara Steen Tara Opsal University of Colorado at Boulder As prison populations in the United States have soared over the last 30 years, offenders who are incarcerated for violating the conditions of their parole rep- resent an increasingly large percentage of the overall population. Little is known, however, about who these offenders are, what they have done to be reincarcerated, or what factors make an offender more or less likely to succeed on parole. In this article, parole release data from the National Corrections Reporting Program are analyzed to identify individual-level predictors of parole success in four states and to assess the relative impact of demographic and legal factors on different offender groups (by race). Keywords: parole revocation; discretion; racial/ethnic disparities in punishment B etween 1980 and the end of the 20th century, the number of people entering prison for parole violations increased dramatically. Whereas in 1980 parole violators represented 17% (27,000) of prison admissions, by 1999 they represented 35% (203,000) of admissions. During this period, the number of offenders admitted to prison for new offenses increased by approximately 350%, whereas the number of offenders admitted for parole violations increased by almost 750%. Stated differently, the number of parole violators admitted to prison in 1999 was greater than the total number of offenders admitted in 1980 (Travis & Lawrence, 2002). Travis and Lawrence argued that we have, in essence, created a separate path to prison The Prison Journal Volume 87 Number 3 September 2007 344-366 2007 Sage Publications 10.1177/0032885507304526 http://tpj.sagepub.com hosted at http://online.sagepub.com 344 AuthorsNote: The title for this article comes from Sheldon Messinger and John Berecocheas 1992 paper, Dont Stay Too Long But Do Come Back Soon: Reflections on the Size and Vicissitudes of Californias Parole Population. at SAN JOSE STATE UNIV on April 28, 2010 http://tpj.sagepub.com Downloaded from for large numbers of former prisoners (p. 24). Although there is an exten-for large numbers of former prisoners (p....
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Steen - http://tpj.sagepub.com The Prison Journal DOI:

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