AXES examples - Effective Paragraphs: AXES To be effective,...

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Unformatted text preview: Effective Paragraphs: AXES To be effective, every paragraph should contain the following, though not necessarily in this order : 1) an Assertion that relates to your main argument 2) an eXample (Quote) that offers support for your Assertion 3) an Explanation that proves why your eXample (quote) backs up your Assertion 4) and Significance : Why is this paragraph significant to your overall argument? To be effective, your paper should contain the same components but may appear in a variety of ways: 1) an Assertion that makes a debatable claim about the text you are analyzing. 2) eXamples (textual evidence = quotes) that support for your Assertion. 3) Explanations that prove why your eXamples support your Assertion 4) and Significance : Why is this issue and my argument important or relevant. Consider AXES as an appeal to your audiences sense of logos, ethos, and pathos: Ethos Demonstrate your credibility : Make an assertion that addresses the prompt. Use eXamples to support your assertion. Sloppy grammar and disorganization make your argument less credible to your audience. Proofread your writing. Logos Demonstrate your reasoning : Use plenty of relevant eXamples. Explain why each eXample supports your assertion. Make the connection between the evidence and your claims clear to your audience. Organize your paper so that your audience can follow and understand your reasoning. Avoid generalizations and vague, unsupported claims. Pathos Make your reader believe : Argumentation may seem distant from human emotion, but our hearts guide our understanding just as often as our minds. Convince your audience that what you say is important. You can accomplish this through your word choice, tone, and use of imagery and examples. A ssertion: the claim of a paragraph. Assertions contain a specific argument, claim, or position which links your arguments to each other and your thesis. Assertions are confident and concrete. Think of an assertion as a thesis statement for the paragraph. An assertion does not summarize. Hoagland is constantly trying to get the reader to relate to the "story" of a turtle. He uses comparisons between turtles, humans, and other animals to reach the reader. He claims that our lives are similar in many ways. For instance they struggle through life like we do, with a box, also known as their shell, always attached to them. In the same way we always have something tied to us that is making us slower . "It's like the nightmare most of us have whimpered through, where we are weighted down disastrously while trying to flee; fleeing our home ground, we try to run"(661). He refers to baby turtles as flowers they soon begin to wilt and die (660). He described turtles as a bird and how both are always on the look out waiting for trouble to happen. Many of these characteristics put a different perspective into the reader's mind, which ultimately is the goal Hoagland is trying to make. He these characteristics put a different perspective into the reader's mind, which ultimately is the goal Hoagland is trying to make....
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AXES examples - Effective Paragraphs: AXES To be effective,...

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