AppendixB-BronfenbrennersEcologicalModelofChildDevelopment

AppendixB-BronfenbrennersEcologicalModelofChildDevelopment...

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Appendix B Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Model of Child Development Some Principles of the Ecology of Human Development Urie Bronfenbrenner and the Ecology of Human Development
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SOME PRINCIPLES OF THE ECOLOGY OF CHILD DEVELOPMENT From the work of Urie Bronfenbrenner, PhD Child development takes place through processes of progressively more complex interaction between an active child and the persons, objects, and symbols in its immediate environment. To be effective, the interaction must occur on a fairly regular basis over extended periods of time. (Adapted from Bronfenbrenner, 1998, p. 996) 1. The child is at the center of this model. 2. The model acknowledges that a child affects as well is affected by the settings in which she spends time. 3. The most important setting for a young child is his family, because that is where he spends the most time and because it has the most emotional influence on him. Other important settings may include his extended family, early care and education programs, health care settings and other community learning sites such as neighborhoods, libraries and playgrounds. 4. A child’s development is determined by what she experiences in these settings she spends time in. Is someone showing the child appropriate ways to behave? Is someone talking and reading with her? Is someone providing materials for her to play with? These experiences, called proximal – or near – processes, that a child has with the people and objects in these settings are “the primary engines of human development.” (1998) EARLY EDUCATION HEALTH OTHER COMMUNITY LEARNING FAMILY
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EDUCATION HEALTH OTHER COMMUNITY LEARNING FAMILY The Complete Ecological Model 5. The number and quality of the connections between the settings in which a young child spends time (for example, his family and preschool) also have important implications for his development. For example, do his parents and teachers communicate with one another often? Do they have similar expectations of him? 6. Other environments where the child doesn’t spend time can also affect the power of proximal processes to influence development. These can include both more immediate factors (for example, the parent’s workplace or community mandates) and more remote ones (for example, federal laws). The information above is drawn from: Bronfenbrenner, U. (2004). Making Human Beings Human: Bioecological Perspectives on Human Development. Bronfenbrenner, U., & Morris, P. A. (1998).The ecology of developmental processes. In W. Damon (Series Ed.) & R. M. Lerner (Vol. Ed.), Handbook of child psychology: Vol. 1: Theoretical models of human development (pp. 993-1028).New York: Wiley. Bronfenbrenner, U. (1979).
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AppendixB-BronfenbrennersEcologicalModelofChildDevelopment...

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