SW175 Week 6 - History of Program Development 1609 Dutch...

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History of Program Development 1609 – Dutch Reformed Church Voluntary collection compulsory taxation Private associations: nationality groups, fraternal societies, and social organizations
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History of Program Development Institutional care Post-Civil War: emergence of many programs YMCA, Salvation Army, Red Cross, Goodwill Industries, Boy Scouts of America
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Identifying the Need Verifying the Need Begin by examining statistical reports such as census data, county government surveys, and health surveys Purpose is to verify that a problem exists within a client population to an extent that warrants the existing or proposed service.
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Identifying the Need Verifying the Need Two different kinds: – Normative Need: focused on comparing the objective living conditions of the target population with what society, or at least that segment of society concerned with helping the target population, deems acceptable or desirable. Demand Need: only those individuals who indicate that they feel or perceive the need themselves would be considered to be in need of a particular program or intervention. Demand data should be combined with normative data to determine the extent which those eligible for a particular program would actually use it.
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Identifying the Need Needs Assessments Five different approaches: 1. Social indicators: data on crime, abuse, housing, health can be gathered from those concerned with these problems. 2. Rates under treatment: the extent to which people demand or utilize service within a community over a period of time, can be obtained from many social agencies. 3. Focused interview or key informant: talking to key informants who are experts or are knowledgeable about the needs of a particular problem area. 4. Focus groups or community forum: easy and quick, but are suspect from a scientific perspective; NIMBY effect 5. Survey: representative random sample of the community or a sample of the target group; accuracy issues if low response rates.
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Identifying the Need Working with an Advisory Group or an Action Board Difficult to develop a new program without the existence and active support of a group in the community that is highly committed to its development.
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Redefining the Task Group Establishing the Board of Directors:
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This note was uploaded on 09/08/2010 for the course SCWK 175 at San Jose State.

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SW175 Week 6 - History of Program Development 1609 Dutch...

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