Kellogg_c8 - Language Kellogg (Chapter 8) Cognition Van...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Cognition Van Selst (Kellogg Chapter 8) Language Kellogg (Chapter 8)
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Cognition Van Selst (Kellogg Chapter 8) Conceptual-Propositional Hypothesis (language-based evidence for propositions) • we analyze and comprehend a sentence by determining the semantic roles played by the words in the sentences • we construct a proposition based on the semantic roles and relationships • we store the results of the analysis in memory in the form of propositions
Background image of page 2
Cognition Van Selst (Kellogg Chapter 8) Language Language is a shared symbolic system of communication • Communication is verbal & non-verbal – (e.g., handshake etc.) • Language is an organized means of combining words in order to communicate. – uses symbols to refer to ideas and relationships that are not currently present – we can refer to things that never existed (e.g., elves) or abstract concepts (e.g., truth). • Through language we can create mental representations of a situation, so that we understand the situation and communicate about it.
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Cognition Van Selst (Kellogg Chapter 8) Value of Language As protohumans evolved into humans, their larynxes and skulls altered to allow them to increase the variety and intricacy of the sounds they could produce. (Willumsen, 1992) The altered larynx meant the possessor could no longer swallow and breathe simultaneously. The advantage had to outweigh the increased change chance for its possessor to die. It is likely that the complexity of gestures, language, and a larger brain evolved together
Background image of page 4
Cognition Van Selst (Kellogg Chapter 8) Properties of Language Receptive : comprehension and decoding of language input. Expressive : encoding and production of language output. – Encoding is transforming thoughts into a form that can be expressed through speech, writing, signs. – Verbal comprehension and verbal fluency are the abilities needed to produce language output. Your receptive vocabulary is larger than your expressive vocabulary
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Cognition Van Selst (Kellogg Chapter 8) Properties of Language (Clark & Clark, 1977) A Language must be learnable by children A Language must be able to be spoken and understood readily by adults A Language must capture ideas that people normally communicate A Language must enable communication among groups of people in a social and cultural context
Background image of page 6
Cognition Van Selst (Kellogg Chapter 8) Properties of Language (an earlier view) Hockett (1960, 1961) was interested in what commonalties existed across all spoken human languages. Linguistic universals are those rules that appear to apply to every human language Hockett did not focus on written language (evolutionarily too recent). Hockett listed universal features (linguistic universals) that he thought were present in all spoken language systems. Four of his original set are still thought to be essential in defining language – many of the others are recognized as "design features" of language rather than basic essentials.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Cognition Van Selst (Kellogg Chapter 8) Hockett’s Linguistic Universals (The original set [1960]) Vocal-Auditory Channel:
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 38

Kellogg_c8 - Language Kellogg (Chapter 8) Cognition Van...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online