Tklee_2008 - Occupational Medicine Advance Access published Occupational Medicine doi:10.1093/occmed/kqn025 A study of South Korean casino

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................................................................................................................................................................................... Occupational Medicine doi:10.1093/occmed/kqn025 A study of South Korean casino employees and gambling problems Tae Kyung Lee 1 , Richard A. LaBrie 2 , Hak Seung Rhee 3 and Howard J. Shaffer 2 Background Casino employees are exposed to disproportionately high levels of gambling, drinking and smoking compared to other occupations. Because of their occupation, they have the opportunity to detect and prevent pathological gambling (PG). Aims To identify differences in the mental health status and social attitudes towards PG among casino workers in South Korea depending upon whether they report any gambling problems. Methods Data were collected from 388 full-time casino employees. This data provided information about the prevalence of gambling problems, alcohol and tobacco use and depression. Employees were grouped according to their scores on the Korean version of South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS), and those employees who gambled without experiencing any gambling problems (Group NP: SOGS 5 0) and those who reported any gambling problems (Group P: SOGS . 0) were compared. An exploratory factor analyses identified the domains of casino employee social attitudes towards gambling. Results Employees who reported gambling problems (Group P) reported a higher prevalence of smoking, alcohol problems and depression ( P , 0.01) compared to employees who did not report gambling problems (Group NP). The primary employee social attitude towards gambling was identified by the factor of ‘Disease concept/social awareness’. Group NP reported more positive attitudes in this domain than Group P ( P , 0.01). Conclusions Employees who reported any gambling problems reported a less positive attitude towards developing the public health system to be responsive to gambling problems. These findings indicate a need to develop health education programmes that focus more specifically on casino employees with gam- bling problems. Key words Casino employees; mental health; pathological gambling; social attitudes. Introduction Casino employees are at greater risk of a variety of health problems compared to the general work force [1–3]. They are exposed to, become familiar with, and have ready access to gambling, alcohol and tobacco. Casino workers have increased proximity to and knowledge of gambling and at the same time are also at the frontline for detecting and preventing pathological gambling (PG). Consequently, some casinos are teaching employ- ees how to identify problem gamblers and direct them to helpline resources [4,5]. We hypothesize that employee experience of gambling problems will influence how they report their mental health and social attitudes to- wards PG. Employee gambling-related experience might be a crucial factor in determining whether respon- sible gambling programmes intended to prevent and re- duce gambling-related harms are going to operate well within casinos.
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Tklee_2008 - Occupational Medicine Advance Access published Occupational Medicine doi:10.1093/occmed/kqn025 A study of South Korean casino

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