Morality and the Good Life I

Morality and the Good Life I - Morality and the Good Life...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 9/8/10 Morality and the Good Life Using our Moral Imagination
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9/8/10 Review The Ring of Gyges – Plato asks the question of ‘Why Be Moral?’ The implication of the story is that anybody would do the same as Gyges and they would be a fool not to. If we condemn Gyges, it’s because we are envious or don’t want to be thought badly of.
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9/8/10 Review People praise moral behavior for the rewards it brings. But the appearance of morality gets these rewards as well as the actual morality, so the prudent person will be concerned with reputation, not morality. “Why be Moral?”
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9/8/10 Review Aristotle’s virtue theory is a character based view: What is the good person like? (Instead of asking: What is the right thing to do? – action based question). General moral virtue is an abiding character trait that makes one a good steward of one’s self-interest (prudent), a good human being, a
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9/8/10 Review Aristotle was interested in the question of how to live “a complete
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Morality and the Good Life I - Morality and the Good Life...

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