Lecture_4 - e tiny moving light The more a point is visited...

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1 e tiny moving light. The more a point is visited, the higher the intensity at that point. ± Radial probability distribution (rpd) If we slice the e density region into layers like in an onion, each layer (a spherical shell) will have a probability equal to: radial probability density × volume of the spherical shell = R 2 × 4 π r 2 dr rpd = R 2 × 4 π r 2 If we plot rpd versus distance from the nucleus ( r) a 0 • maximum at 0.529 Å radius of the1 st Bohr orbit (a 0 ) • In Bohr theory: e assumed to be always at that distance! • In QM model: e is most probably found there.
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2 ± Size of the orbital Def : size of an s orbital the radius of a sphere that encloses 90% of the total electron probability; i.e. 90% of the time the e is inside that sphere. a Boundary Surface. ± to understand higher energy orbitals, we need to introduce quantum numbers. 6. Quantum Numbers: Each solution of the Schrödinger wave equation (SWE) is a wave function Ψ , or atomic orbital. Each orbital is characterized by
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This note was uploaded on 09/07/2010 for the course FAS chem 201 taught by Professor Sultan during the Summer '07 term at American University of Beirut.

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Lecture_4 - e tiny moving light The more a point is visited...

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