Ethics1b.pdf - impaginato ethics 1 17:34 Pagina 17 ETHICAL ISSUES IN FOOD AND AGRICULTURE breakup of traditional family units accelerated urbanization

Ethics1b.pdf - impaginato ethics 1 17:34 Pagina 17 ETHICAL...

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E THICAL ISSUES IN FOOD AND AGRICULTURE 17 breakup of traditional family units, accelerated urbanization and the globalization of markets, information and culture. In the face of persistent and widespread hunger, therefore, the 1996 Rome Declaration on World Food Security and the World Food Summit Plan of Action reaffirmed the right of everyone to have access to safe and nutritious food and specified the need to clarify the definition of the right to food. They also reaffirmed the fundamental right of everyone to be free from hunger, as stated in the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights and other relevant international and regional instruments, urging particular attention to the implementation and full and progressive realization of these rights as a means of achieving food security for all. While the globalization of the world°s economy is proceeding rapidly, the creation of a global society is only now beginning to be considered. Goods, services and especially capital flow freely across national borders at ever-increasing rates, yet people remain largely constrained by national borders. For nations, businesses and consumers, action in the market is limited by access to capital; those without any means have no voice in the marketplace. And although every nation has institu- tions that supplement market forces with some form of social safety net to support people who are unable to draw adequate benefit from the market, the solidarity net- work among nations is rather underdeveloped. Yet, a global market without a global society could be self-destructive. First, it may divide people between those who participate in the market and those who lack the means to do so, both within nations and among them. Whether it be for lack of education and capital or because they are exploited, those who cannot participate will reject the global market as yet another threat to their livelihoods. Second, the global market might involve the construction of international institutions that claim the allegiance of only a small ±lite. Citizens in both industrialized and developing nations may therefore reject global markets, plunging the world into conflicts at the national and international levels. In contrast, little attention has been given to the prerequistes for building a glob- al society. Such a society would embody the values put forth in dozens of interna- tional treaties and declarations that treat people as citizens rather than consumers . But how can we build a global society in which poverty, hunger and malnutrition are reduced or, better, eliminated? Clearly, to achieve this goal, many diverse interests must be reconciled and sev- eral complex and protracted conflicts resolved. Other choices are conceivable but not attractive. There may be parties who believe they can triumph over others but, An emerging global economy, but not a global society
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in the long term, there are no winners. No matter how difficult it may be, people must recognize that their fate is bound to that of others, as is the fate of the planet.
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