188B Week One

188B Week One - 1 188B Week One: Monday I. The Silent...

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188B Week One: Monday I. The Silent Masters #1 / 1916 INTOLERANCE DW Griffith: Master Of Cinema SPOILER ALERT! This film is nearly 100 years old and viewing it today can be difficult for any modern audience and especially for anyone from the MTV, YouTube, facebook, instant- gratification generation. Many of the film’s production and acting styles are quite dated by today’s standards and of course being a silent film, there is no spoken dialog, only music and title cards. However, if you are able to let yourself go, to “take a trip” and ease back into another time, another age, one where there was no Internet, no mass communication, no television, no cell phones, you can discover a film filled with staggering cinematic accomplishments. Sets that stand over six stories high, extend for three eights of a mile in length and are filled with thousands of costumed extras and animals. Battle scenes, love scenes, nudity, violence and the never seen before or since, storytelling structure that encompassed four separate narratives and four different epochs of time. .. 1
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THE CREATIVE TEAM: Writers: D.W. Griffith / Anita Loos Director: D. W. Griffith Cinematographer: G. W. “Billy” Bitzer, Karl Brown WHY IS THIS FILM VISIONARY: Even though it was produced in 1916, D.W. Griffith’s astounding cinematic vision propelled the language of film decades into the future. His use of huge master shots, extreme close ups, masking the frame horizontally and vertically, the iris in and the iris out, massive dolly and crane work, not to mention laying out for the audience four separate stories of humanities Intolerance, told in four different colors through four different times in history… This film is truly a cinematic achievement that is still unequaled today and has never been attempted again. THE BASICS: In this unparalleled Masterwork D.W. Griffith had each story hand tinted a different color , to help the audience follow along as the film covered nearly 2,500 years of human history and Intolerance. A lot has transpired since 1916 and much of the original hand tinting has been lost, or re-printed incorrectly. Basically form what I have been able to find out: The Modern Story was Black & White & Sepia. The Fall of Babylon was Blue & Orange. The Crucifixion of Christ was Magenta and the French Huguenots was Green. 2
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First: 1914 AD. The Modern Story that opens and closes the film, the tale of a mother losing her child to those who felt morally superior and of her husband about to be hanged for a crime that he did not commit. Second: 539 BC. The excesses, intrigues and deceptions that lead to the The Fall of Babylon. Third:
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188B Week One - 1 188B Week One: Monday I. The Silent...

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