188B Week Two

188B Week Two - 1 188B Week Two: Monday III. The...

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188B Week Two: Monday III. The International New Wave Part I #6 / 1947 THE BICYCLE THIEF Vittorio De Sica: A New Realism SPOILER ALERT! In the Dictionary “realism” is defined as: “The quality or fact of representing a person, thing, or situation accurately or in a way that is.” That is precisely what the Italian Neo Realist filmmakers were doing. Especially what Vittorio De Sica was doing in The Bicycle Thief. He was showing the world at large, the reality of 1947 post-war Italy, the unemployment, the desperation, the hopelessness. These innovative and visionary Italian filmmakers set the stage for the French New Wave, The American Independents and eventually the total democratization of the Cinema that we are experiencing today. THE CREATIVE TEAM: Writers: Luigi Bartolini / Cesare Zavattii / Suso d'Amico / Vittorio De Sica / Oreste Biancoli / Adolfo Franci / Gerardo Guerrieri 1
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Director: Vittorio De Sica Cinematographer: Carlo Montuori Editor: Eraldo Da Roma WHY IS THIS FILM VISIONARY: The Bicycle Thief was one of the first films to show the world that not only could films be made in the streets, they could star people from the streets. As a result of the devastation caused by WWII, with their country, their cities and studios reduced to rubble, the Italian Neo-Realists were still determined to make films. With no real infrastructure to support them, they were forced to strip away nearly all of the artifice from the process of film production and distill it down to its very essence. The Bicycle Thief is one of the best examples of the bold, fresh and stunning Italian Neo-Realism. They would use whatever equipment and crewmembers they could scrape together, but often their team only consisted of a handful of collaborators. It could be as sparse as a director, a cinematographer, a script girl taking down what the actors said, because there was no direct sound, and an assortment of assistants and technicians. The actors were often non-actors, who were cast for their look, or as Mr. De Sica has stated in the case of the man and his son in The Bicycle Thief , for their distinctive walks. THE BASICS: Europe and many parts of Italy lay in ruins. The young critics and filmmakers in Italy led by Luchino Visconti with Ossessione and Roberto Rossellini with Rome, Open City , simply used whatever was on hand, got into the streets and began to make their post-war 2
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films. Rebelling against the sophisticated studio-made “white telephone” films of pre- war Italy they wanted their films to reflect the plight of the ordinary citizens who now faced a staggering, 25% unemployment. These visionary Directors often utilized what was at hand and that included natural locations, available light and non-professional actors. They told their stories and made their films in such a fresh and vibrant way, that the
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188B Week Two - 1 188B Week Two: Monday III. The...

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