Frabutt - PANEL ENVISIONING A JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM THAT...

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PANEL ENVISIONING A JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM THAT SUPPORTS POSITIVE YOUTH DEVELOPMENTt JAMES M. FRABu-rr* KRiSTEN L. Di LucA** KELLY N. GRAvEs*** INT•ODUCrION Is it possible to envision a juvenile justice system in this country that seeks to uphold and protect community safety but also offers youth an opportunity for change, restitution, and rehabilitation? Should we envision such a possibility? And, would we even be satisfied with it if it came to fruition? ,We believe that we can and should. Moreover, we are not alone in advocating for a significant paradigm shift in re-framing the role and function of the American juvenile justice system. Numerous child advo- cates, scholars, and practitioners have issued a clarion call for an integrated system that meets youths' .needs with a system of ser- vices and support wholly focused on helping them become sta- t On November 7, 2007, the Policy hosted a panel discussion entitled, "Lost Innocence: Hope and Punish- ment in the Juvenile Justice System." Dr. Frabutt's remarks have been revised and incorporated into this article. * Faculty member in the Alliance for Catholic Education Leadership Program and Concurrent Associate Professor of Psychology at the University of Notre Dame; BA, Psychology, University of Notre Dame; Human Development and Family Studies, University of North Carolina at Greensboro. ** Research Associate and Evaluation Manager for the Center for Youth, Family, and Community Partnerships at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro; BA, Psychology, Humboldt State University. Mrs. Di Luca serves as a research partner for the Middle District of North Carolina Project Safe Neighborhoods initiatives, a data-driven strategy to reduce gun- and gang- related violence in eight city- and county-wide collaboratives in the District. *** Associate Director of the Center for Youth, Family, and Community Partnerships at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro; BA, Psychol- ogy, Virginia Polytechnic Institute; MA, Psychology, Wake Forest University; Ph.D., Psychology, University of North Carolina at Greensboro. 107
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NOTRE DAME JOURNAL OF LAW, ETHICS & PUBLIC POLICY [Vol. 22 ble, competent adults.' This article reaffirms the case for a positive youth development orientation in the juvenile justice sys- tem. The juvenile system of North Carolina is used as a frame of reference to describe several leverage points for building a jus- tice system that makes such an approach a reality: "* engaging a system-wide focus and commitment to treat- ment, rehabilitation, and restoration; "o proactively addressing thle mental-health issues of court- involved youth; "* granting specialized attention to the facility-to-community transition process for incarcerated'youth; "o investing fiscal, social, and human capital in the power of prevention, relying on a network of evidence-based, cost- effective, community-based,programs. I.
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Frabutt - PANEL ENVISIONING A JUVENILE JUSTICE SYSTEM THAT...

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