8printercarriage-atmel

8printercarriage-atmel - Printer Carriage Motion Control...

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Printer Carriage Motion Control Laboratory Printer-1 Printer Carriage Motion Control Learning Objectives By the end of this laboratory experiment, the experimenter should be able to: Use a quad push-pull driver chip for bi-directional dc motor control. Use reflective photo-switches, opto-interrupter switches, and micro-switches for motion control. Explain how and why limit switches are used to prevent over-travel. Components Qty. Item 1 Atmel ATmega 128 microcontroller, STK500 and STK501 interface boards, and serial port cable. 1 Solderless Breadboard 1 Printer carriage assembly 1 Photo-interrupter (Optek OPB960T51) and mechanical limit switch bracket 1 Photo-reflective (OMRON EE-SB54-E) and mechanical limit switch bracket 1 L293D or SN754410 quad push-pull driver with diodes 1 74LS04 hex inverter Overview The purpose of this lab is to help you learn how construct a system with multiple sensors, a motor, and switches and interface these with the ATmega 128 microcontroller. Figure 1 below shows how all the components come together to complete the printer system. Figure 1. Printer carriage system. The printer carriage system consists of sensing modules (Modules 1 and 2), a power interface (Module 3), the carriage motor and end-of-travel limit switches (Module 4), a momentary switch, and the microcontroller. © San José State University Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 14MAR2008 rev 3
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Printer Carriage Motion Control Laboratory Printer-2 Introduction Switches are common devices that permit or interrupt the flow of current In addition to simply controlling electrical power to a device (such as a motor or light), they can be used in motion control to detect whether or not a movable element has reached a predetermined position. Mechanical switches come in a variety of designs. They are all referred to by the number of poles and throws they have. The number of poles represents the number of separate circuits that can be completed by the same action of the actuating lever or button. The number of throws represents the number of individual contacts for each pole. The most common types are shown in Figure 1 below. Single-pole/single-throw Single-pole/double-throw Double-pole/double-throw Double-pole/single-throw Figure 2. Examples of different switch configurations. The number of poles represents the number of separate circuits that can be completed by the same action of the movable contact(s) inside the switch. The number of throwsrepresents the number of individual contacts for each pole. Micro-switches typically refer to mechanical switches of small size that have a spring-loaded, momentary contact, operated by a push-button directly or via a pivoted cantilever. Micro-switches find use in many consumer products such as notebook computers, appliances (to detect if a cover is closed), etc. Switches are comprised of moving or sliding mechanical elements are designed to operate for thousands to hundreds of thousands of on-off cycles. Opto-switches (e.g. opto-interrupters, etc.) are often used in mechatronic devices to indicate that
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This note was uploaded on 09/08/2010 for the course ME 106 at San Jose State University .

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8printercarriage-atmel - Printer Carriage Motion Control...

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