Psychology_ch10

Psychology_ch10 - Chapter 10 Prosocial Behavior: Helping...

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Chapter 10 – Prosocial Behavior: Helping Others Prosocial behavior – a helpful action that benefits other people without necessarily providing any direct benefits to the person performing the act, and may even involve a risk for the person who helps (Volunteer Firefighters) Altruism – behavior that reflects an unselfish concern for the welfare of others. All started with …The murder of Kitty Genovese Barmaid going home at night, but gets stabbed. She screams and begs for her life. Attacker left for a while and returned when he realized no one was coming to help. It continues for 45 min. 38 witnesses – no one came outside or called police Might’ve lived if less people heard her Why didn’t anyone help Kitty Genovese? Situational Features that Influence Altruism 1. The Presence of Others Bystander Effect –likelihood of a prosocial response to an emergency is affected by the number of bystanders who are present. As the number of bystanders increases, the probability that any one bystander will help decreases and the amount of time that passes before help occurs increases. Latane and Darley’s Lab “Emergency” Ps were alone in a room, talking with other p’s thru an intercom One of them suddenly fakes a seizure Took longer to respond when real p’s thought there were other ppl present 1
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Why does the presence of others inhibit helpfulness? a. Diffusion of responsibility – amt of responsibility assumed by bystanders is shared If u go to a deserted beach and see someone drowning, u have 100% responsibility May assume others already reacted (esp if you can’t see them) Ambiguity in interpretation of situation look to others to see what they’re doing If no one reacts, we may think it’s not a real emergency b. Ambiguity in the interpretation of the situation. Where There's Smoke, There's (Sometimes) Fire Ps filling out a questionannaire – room begins to fill with smoke. It gets so bad that Ps have to lean head out of window to finish quest. Conditions 1) P alone 2) 3 P’s 3) 1 P, 2 confederates who ignored smoke Results – alone- 75% reported smoke With 2 others – 30% With 2 others who ignored smoke – 10% Thought smoke was harmless or just a part of the experiment c. Evaluation apprehension – if we know that other ppl are watching us, we may get “stage fright” d. Smoke study – may have been afraid of looking like a coward e. Can make us more likely to help (so that we don’t seem uncaring) 2
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2. Environmental Conditions Effects of Weather (Cunningham) 1) Questionnaire study – more likely to help in good weather (sunny day) 2) Restaurant study (inside) – wait staff got better tips on sunny days Effects of City Size – more likely to help in smaller cities. Size of hometown irrelevant. Research finds that when it comes to helping strangers in distress,
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This note was uploaded on 09/08/2010 for the course PSYC 2040 taught by Professor Adair during the Spring '10 term at LSU.

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Psychology_ch10 - Chapter 10 Prosocial Behavior: Helping...

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