psycholinguistic vocab

psycholinguistic vocab - Glossary of terms, abbreviations,...

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Glossary of terms, abbreviations, and symbols -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- * asterisk indicates a sentence's syntactic ill-formedness (ungrammaticality) (1) * The had pipsqueak the nerve confront me to. Enclosing material that is preceded by an asterisk with parentheses indicates that including the material in parentheses is ungrammatical. Thus, (2) abbreviates the examples in (3). (2) a. The (*those) cats like treats. b. My cats like(*s) treats. (3) a. i. The cats like treats. ii. * The those cats like treats. b. i. My cats like treats. ii. * My cats likes treats. On the other hand, prefixing an asterisk to material that is enclosed in parentheses indicates that the parenthesized material is obligatory. Thus, (4) abbreviates the examples in (5). (4) a. i. They consumed *(dinner). b. My cat like*(s) treats. (5) a. i. * They consumed. ii. They consumed dinner. b. i. * My cat like treats. ii. My cat likes treats. { } curly brackets Curly brackets enclose alternatives. For instance, (1) abbreviates the two examples in (2). (1) They do { not, so } like your brother. (2) a. They do not like your brother. b. They do so like your brother. Curly brackets may be combined with parentheses. ( ) parentheses Parentheses enclose optional elements. For instance, (1) abbreviates the two examples in (2). (1) They do (not) like your brother. (2) a. They do like your brother. b. They do not like your brother. Parentheses may be combined with curly brackets. For instance, (3) abbreviates the examples in (4). (3) They do ( { not, so } ) like your brother. (4) a. They do like your brother. b. They do not like your brother. b. They do so like your brother. % percent A percent sign indicates that an example is accepted as grammatical by some speakers, but rejected by others. (1) a. % This book was given me by my husband. (ok British; * American) b. % We use a gas stove anymore; anymore, we use a gas stove. (chiefly Midwest, but found throughout United States except New England; earliest recorded examples from Northern Ireland)
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# pound sign indicates a sentence's semantic or pragmatic ill-formedness (1) # Colorless green ideas sleep furiously. abl ablative case acc accusative case adposition Any P, regardless of whether it is head-initial or head-final. See Chapter 5 for examples. See also postposition. algorithm An explicit, step-by-step procedure for solving a problem. Examples: instructions for installing a water filter or for filing your income taxes; a pesto recipe; a knitting pattern. argument
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psycholinguistic vocab - Glossary of terms, abbreviations,...

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