week 8 day 4 cjs - Part 1: Appellate courts are different...

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Part 1: Appellate courts are different from trial courts in several ways. First the appellate court rulings are used to standardize what is used to judge trial courts. Meaning that if an appellate court also known as the court of last resort sees a case it is usually because somewhere in the justice system there was a procedural error or legal issue. The appellate court corrects this error throughout the system to make sure this error does not happen again. Another area where the appellate court differs from a trial court is when an appellate court comes to a ruling all courts under its jurisdiction must obeyed by the ruling that has been set. However in a trial court the ruling only is within that court. The defendant may try to take it to the appellate court to overturn the ruling from a trial court. The main problem with trying to take a case to an appellate court is that they are so busy they will only see a set number of cases. These cases are based on a committee review to see if they would even need to be reviewed. One of the standards are if the criminal justice process and procedures where over
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This note was uploaded on 09/10/2010 for the course CJS AAAF0PR0P7 taught by Professor Jones during the Spring '10 term at University of Phoenix.

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week 8 day 4 cjs - Part 1: Appellate courts are different...

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