Lecture Five - -no instruments, polyphonic, english music...

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Lecture Five 9/3/10 Texture - can be used for the whole piece, or exchanged throughout the performance. Monophonic - one voice Monophony. A single melody line. Homophonic - melody with accompaniment Homophony. Most music is homophonic. Polyphonic - many voices or sounds. Uses counterpoint - melodies are fitted up against melodies, sounds very busy. Polyphony. Musical style - how the elements of music interact. Can be separated into 8 main time periods. 1. Middle ages 476-1475 (Hildegard: O Greenest Branch) -Monophonic religious music 2. Renaissance 1475-1600 (As Vesta was from Latmos Hill Descending)
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Unformatted text preview: -no instruments, polyphonic, english music 3. Baroque 1600-1750 (Bach: Brandenburg Concerto 5, I)-polyphonic, strong rhythm, there is a beat to it 4. Classical 1750-1820 (Mozart: Symphony No. 40)-strong rhythm, more dynamic 5. Romantic 1820-1900 (Berlioz, Symphony Fantastique, V)-more dynamic than classical, dark, like watching a movie 6. Impressionism 1880-1920 Debussy (Voiles: from Preludes) 7. Modern 1890-1985 (Schoenbeg: Pierrot Lunaire, Madonna)-horrible 8. Postmodern 1945-present (Adams: Short Ride in a Fast Machine)-very strong rhythm, polyphonic...
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Lecture Five - -no instruments, polyphonic, english music...

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