Analyzing Moral Problems into Four Components (PWRPNT HARRIS)

Analyzing Moral Problems into Four Components (PWRPNT HARRIS)

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Analyzing Moral Problems into Four Components
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1. Factual Issues Facts = Known and Uncontroversial Factual Issue = A question of fact which is a) unknown or controversial and b) relevant to the moral problem In class, we often have to make an assumption about the facts Different assumptions can result in different moral conclusions
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2. Conceptual Issues A conceptual issue is a question about the meaning of a term that is crucial in the moral analysis (“clean,” “safe,” “acceptable risk,” “bribe,” “conflict of interest,” etc.) We resolve conceptual issues by either a) finding the definition in appropriate policies or laws or b) coming up with one of our own by looking at typical or paradigm examples
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3. Application Issues An application issue is a question about whether a concept applies in a given situation Is this a “bribe”? Is this a “conflict of interest”?
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Unformatted text preview: Is this procedure safe? Etc. 4. Moral Issue A moral issue arises when we must decide whether an act is right or wrong Many application issues are really moral issues (Relevance Problems) Is this a bribe? Is this action a lie? Classic moral issues involve deciding which conflicting value should prevail (Conflict Problems) In this situation, should cost considerations prevail over a slight decrease in safety? One Other Important Distinction 1. Presumptive Judgment A preliminary judgment about what is right and wrong, when all factors have not been considered- This is a violation of confidentiality, so it is probably wrong. 2. All-Things-Considered Judgment A final judgment, when all factors have been considered- This violation of confidentiality is justified, because the safety of the public is at risk....
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This note was uploaded on 09/11/2010 for the course ENGR 482 taught by Professor Russell during the Fall '08 term at Texas A&M.

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Analyzing Moral Problems into Four Components (PWRPNT HARRIS)

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