Red.Hat.9

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Unformatted text preview: Virtual
Machine
Setup
­
Red
Hat
9
 Step
1:
 Goto
ftp://archive.download.redhat.com/pub/redhat/linux/9/en/iso/i386/
 with
either
Firefox
or
Internet
Explorer.

 If
you
wish,
you
can
use
a
FTP
application
as
well.
 Step
2:
 
 Download

 shrike‐i386‐disc1.iso
 shrike‐i386‐disc2.iso
 shrike‐i386‐disc3.iso
 After
the
download
is
complete,
copy
these
files
to
C:\Virtual
Machines\
 Step
3:
 Log
into
you
VMware
Server
using
Firefox/IE.
 The
default
address
should
be:
 
 https://localhost:8333/
 Step
4:
 
 Click
on
Virtual
Machine
 
Create
Virtual
Machine
 
 
 
 
 Step
5:
 
 Type
Red
Hat
9
in
the
name
textbox
and
click
Next
 Step
6:
 
 Select
Linux
Operating
system
and
select
Red
Hat
from
the
drop
down
box.

Click
 Next.
 Advance:
 This
portion
of
the
wizard
seems
pretty
straightforward,
but
there
are
some
things
 happening
in
the
background.
Choosing
the
correct
label
will
allow
the
optimized
 treatment
of
the
guest
OS.

In
reality,
you
can
use
Other
operating
systems
­>
 Other
(32­bit),
and
the
virtual
machine
would
start
up
just
fine.
VMware
Server
 would
just
have
trouble
figuring
out
which
version
of
VMware
Tools
to
install.
Also
 the
performance
of
the
guest
OS
may
suffer
because
of
it.

 Therefore
even
thought
you
may
fine
a
OS
that
is
not
support
in
VMware,
chances
 are
that
you
can
install
it
as
a
virtual
machine,
but
the
performance
would
be
 horrendous.
For
example,
Mac
OSX
10.5
Server
(developers
edition).

 If
the
click
on
Product
Compatibility,
you
can
make
the
VM
transferable
to
 older/other
versions
of
VMware.
Doing
so
could
disable
some
new
features
and
 lower
performance
slightly.

If
you’re
planning
to
move
a
virtual
machine
to
another
 place
without
knowing
the
version,
setting
the
Virtual
Hardware
to
4
is
the
best
 option.
Keep
in
mind
you
still
need
ESX
3+,
Fusion
1.0+,
Server
1.0+,
or
Workstation
 5+
in
order
to
read
the
VM. Step
7: 
 Don’t
change
anything
and
click
Next.
 Advance:
 At
this
screen
you
can
change
the
amount
of
ram
that
the
operating
system
can
use.
 If
you’re
using
a
32‐bit
VM
+
1
CPU,
the
highest
amount
of
ram
the
system
can
 support
is
4GB.

Beyond
4GB,
the
32‐bit
OS
cannot
take
advance
of
the
extra
 resources.
 Best
practice
is
to
set
the
amount
of
RAM
to
the
minimal
that
you
would
need.
For
a
 security
lab,
usually
the
system
is
not
in
usage;
therefore
the
minimal
requirement
 would
be
the
minimal
requirement
of
the
OS.

This
would
make
the
system
slow
for
 usage,
but
we’re
testing
for
security
and
not
for
usage.

 Changing
the
processor
count
is
helpful
if
the
VM
is
going
to
do
some
heaving
 processing.
Otherwise
leave
it
to
1. Step
8:
 
 Click
Create
a
New
Virtual
Disk.
 Advance:
 This
section
of
the
wizard
sets
the
virtual
hard
drive
for
the
VM.
If
you
have
created
 a
Virtual
Disk
prior,
you
can
import
it
here.

The
option
to
Don’t
Add
a
Hard
(I
bet
 that’s
a
typo),
allows
you
to
test
bootable
OS’s
like
Knoppix
or
UBCD.
These
OS’s
 don’t
require
disk
to
run. Step
9: 
 Set
the
Capacity
as
4
GB,
and
click
Next.
 Advance:
 Under
File
Options,
this
allows
you
to
pre‐allocate
the
space
for
the
virtual
disk
 ahead
of
time
and
this
does
slightly
improve
performance.
The
option
to
Split
disk
 into
2
GB,
allows
for
the
files
to
be
moved
onto
a
partition
that
does
not
support
 files
above
4GB
(i.e.
FAT32).
This
then
allows
the
transfer
of
VMs
on
USB
drives.
 Under
Disk
Mode,
the
setting
allows
you
to
set
the
disk
as
Independent.
Doing
so
 would
give
the
allow
the
VM
to
save
the
data
to
non‐persistent.
That
means
any
 chances
to
the
virtual
disk
would
be
discarded
after
you
reboot
the
VM.
After
you
 install
the
OS,
and
made
the
necessary
modifications,
setting
non‐persistent
would
 allow
you
to
reboot
back
to
a
good
setting
without
doing
anything
else.
The
 drawback
would
be
when
you
DO
want
to
save
the
changes,
but
in
order
to
do
so
 you
need
to
revert
back
to
persistent.
So
be
careful
when
you
use
this
setting.
 Under
Virtual
Device
Node,
allows
for
you
to
change
how
the
virtual
disk
appears
 to
the
VM.
You
can
set
it
to
a
SCSI
disk
with
a
different
ID.
 Under
Policies,
you
are
allowed
the
set
the
write
cache
for
the
virtual
disk.
This
 would
affect
performance
depending
on
the
usage
of
the
system. Step
10:
 
 Click
Add
a
Network.
 Step
11:
 
 Select
NAT
from
the
drop
down
menu,
then
click
Next.
 Advnace:
 If
you’re
connected
directly
into
the
USC
network,
then
NAT
is
mandatory.
USC’s
 network
detects
if
there
are
more
then
one
MAC
address
on
a
single
port.
If
there
 are
then
the
port
is
disabled.
Therefore,
changing
to
NAT
would
be
like
connecting
a
 router
to
the
network.

 HostOnly,
is
similar
to
private.
This
would
only
allow
the
VM
to
talk
with
the
host.
 Bridge,
is
the
best
option
if
your
network
is
allows
for
multiple
MAC
address
to
 appear
on
a
single
port. Step
12: 
 Click
on
Use
an
ISO.
 Advance:
 You
can
directly
connect
to
a
physical
CD/DVD
rom
or
use
an
ISO.
This
setting
can
 be
change
from
VMware
Player,
but
adding
a
CD/DVD
rom
during
the
creation
is
 important. Step
12b:
 
 If
you
placed
your
*.iso
files
in
the
C:\Virtual
Machines\
directory
you
should
see
 your
Red
Hat
9
installation
files.

 Select
shrike­i386­disc1.iso
and
press
OK Step
13: After
the
*.iso
files
has
been
selected
please
Next
 Step
14: 
 Click
on
the
link
Don’t
Add
a
Floppy
 Step
15: 
 Click
Add
a
USB
 Step
16: Review
the
virtual
machine
you
are
creating,
and
if
everything
is
ok
click
Finish
 Advance:
 When
you
look
at
the
directory
where
the
VM
was
created
you
will
see
a
bunch
of
 files:
 *.vmdk
–
This
is
the
virtual
disk.
In
fact
you
can
mount
the
VMDK
without
using
any
 VMware
software.
 *.vmx
–
this
is
a
flat
text
file
containing
all
the
configuration
of
the
virtual
machine
 *.nvram
–
Virtual
Machine
BIOS
 *.vmss
–
Suspend
state
data
of
the
virtual
machine
 *.vmsd
–
This
stores
metadata
on
the
snapshots
 *.vmxf
–
information
of
virtual
machines
that
are
in
a
team
 *.log
–
log
files

 
 Step
17:
 Start
the
installation
of
Red
Hat
9.

 ...
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This document was uploaded on 09/13/2010.

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