Pro Tools for Video, Film and Multimedia

Pro Tools for Video, Film and Multimedia - Pro Tools for...

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Unformatted text preview: Pro Tools for Video, Film and Multimedia BY Charles Gutierrez History of Synchronization • Early attempts at synchronization • Edison – The Sneeze 1884 the image went to kinetoscope and the sound went to disc. • 1922 – photoelectric cells transduce soundwaves into lightwaves and are printed to the edge of film tape. They are then read by a photoelectric cell. • Vitaphone – sound on disc system that uses 331/3rpm discs. First used by Warner Bros. on the movie “Don Juan” to replace the orchestra, but still no dialog on film. • First Talkie pictures were the “ Jazz Singer ” in 1927 starring Al Jolsen, “ Lights of New York ” in 1928, and Disney’s “ Steam Boat Willy ” of 1928, the first all postproduction audio film including dialog, sound effects and music. • “ Fantasia ” first use of multi-track media in a film. Innovations from “Fantasia” of 1954 • Multi-track recording using synchronized optical recorders. • Overdubbing of different parts of the orchestra • Click track used by conductor and animators to choreograph animation and audio mixdown • Multi channel surround playback systems • “ Panpot ” used to move sound across screen • Control track on film used to regenerate dynamics from optical recording – noise reduction • Use of Oscilloscopes to monitor recording levels - predecessor of VU meters. All mechanical synchronization at this time – 1930’s • Moviola – a sprocket based sync system. Still in use today because of ease of use and reliability. It is being replaced by digital technology such as Final Cut, Avid and Pro Tools. Television and Video Recording • 1940’s first transmission of black and white television • 1953 FCC approves of a backwards-compatible system for composite color video reception to standard TV’s. • The National Television Systems Committee – NTSC , develops this format. • 1952 Ampex records and playback the first recognizable videotape signal. • Throughout the 1950’s and 60’s many un-standardized formats of video recording, editing synchronization developed. • 1969 the Society of Motion Picture and Television SMPTE develops and creates a standardized timecode for video sync and tape locations. Still in use today. Milestones of Today • 1977 – “Star Wars” is recognized as first movie to have a Sound Design as an art form. • “Apocalypse Now” is credited with the first Sound Designer film credit. • Internet Video - Flash, .WMV and QuickTime movies CODEC’S • Data compression expansion device used to get larger data files onto storage media device or streaming system. HDTV • Wider format picture aspect ratios 16:9 vs. regular 4:3. Emulates film industry....
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This note was uploaded on 09/13/2010 for the course MUIN 486 taught by Professor Charlesgutierrez during the Fall '10 term at USC.

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Pro Tools for Video, Film and Multimedia - Pro Tools for...

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