Chapter_14

Chapter_14 - Signal transduction depends on molecular...

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Signal transduction depends on molecular circuits Input Output G proteins transmit a signal with GTP bound and are “silent” with GDP bound
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Signal transduction depends on molecular circuits Arousal (threat response) Meal (digestion) Wound (healing)
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Signal transduction depends on molecular circuits I. Signal •. Estrogen -- into cells; •. Those cannot enter cells II. Membrane receptors transfer information •. Bind ligands at extracellular domain •. Conformational change (primary messege)
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Signal transduction depends on molecular circuits III. Secondary messengers amplify the signal 1. Free diffusion 2. Amplification 3. Cross talk
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Signal transduction depends on molecular circuits IV. Protein phosphorylation is a common means of information transfer V. The signal is terminated by protein phosphatases (for example)
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Seven-transmembrane-helix receptors Summary Rhodopsin Epinephrine Rhodopsin was the first 7TM receptor structure solved
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Seven-transmembrane-helix receptors Summary Epinephrine (primary messenger) binding leads to cyclic AMP
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Seven-transmembrane-helix receptors I. Ligand binding leads to the activation of G proteins Alpha subunit is P- loop NTPase
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Seven-transmembrane-helix receptors I. Ligand binding leads to the activation of G proteins α, β, γ subunits α - P-loop NTPase family β- a seven-bladed propeller structure γ - a pair of α helices
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Seven-transmembrane-helix receptors I. Ligand binding leads to the activation of G proteins α exchanges GDP to GTP α and βγ dissociates
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Seven-transmembrane-helix receptors II. Activated G proteins transmit signals by binding to other proteins Adenylate cyclase is a membrane protein 12 membrane spanning helices 2 large intracellular catalytic domains
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Seven-transmembrane-helix receptors II. Activated G proteins transmit signals by binding to other proteins G α is released from the trimer G α binds adenylate cyclase at the βγ interface and increases its activity
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This note was uploaded on 09/13/2010 for the course BIOL 4087 taught by Professor Waldrop during the Spring '08 term at LSU.

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Chapter_14 - Signal transduction depends on molecular...

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