1-6 Zooplankton

1-6 Zooplankton - Zooplankton Topic 8 Chapter 2 Zooplankton...

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Zooplankton Topic 8 Chapter 2
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Zooplankton Zooplankton are taxonomically diverse most protist and metazoan phyla represented Smallest are single-celled, nanoplankton-sized, heterotrophs (2-20 µm) Largest are jellyfish (> 200 cm)
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Importance of zooplankton: Net-sized zooplankton link phytoplankton to fish and large crustaceans in food webs that include fisheries species
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Kinds of zooplankton: 1. Holoplankton species that live their entire life cycle as plankton in water column 2. Meroplankton juveniles and adults are benthic or nektonic 3. Many fishes and other nekton have planktonic larval stages
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Zooplankton diversity: There are about 5000 species of holoplankton 500,000 or more benthic species Why so few pelagic species? Pelagic zone has few barriers to dispersal – species have wide distributions Few specialized microhabitats like mudflats or reefs
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Protists Include foraminiferans (calcium carbonate shell), radiolarians (silica shell), microflagellates and ciliates Protozoans ingest bacteria, and their remains create oozes in the deep sea They form the basis of paleo- oceanography; data collected by coring the ocean floor Many are eaten by small net zooplankton
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Foraminiferan Radiolarian: Figure 2.9
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Copepods and euphausiids are crustaceans Copepods are the most beautiful and important animals in the world Most important zooplankton 1 - several mm in length weak swimmers but can “jump” when attacked by predators Live in a high Re but suspension feed in a low-Re environment
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Figure 2.7
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Copepod feeding: Suspension-feeding herbivores Filter/trap net-sized phytos with a complex basket-like structure associated with mouthparts Feathery head appendages draw water to the mouth where particles are selected, captured on small hairs and crushed by a chitinous mandible http://youtube.com/watch?
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