1-2 Ocean Currents & Climate

1-2 Ocean Currents & Climate - OCEAN CIRCULATION...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–10. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: OCEAN CIRCULATION PATTERNS Chapter 1 pages 1-19 Seawater is constantly moving surface currents in three dimensions OCEAN CIRCULATION Wind and the rotation of the earth combine to cause surface currents Current direction and temperature predictable Currents influence biota Coriolis Effect Earth rotates to the east one revolution per day A particle at rest on the equator travels faster (1700 km/h) than a particle at a pole (800 km/h) to complete this revolution This velocity difference causes the Coriolis effect Coriolis Effect Effect is zero at the equator but increases with latitude Water moving north in the northern hemisphere deflects to the east always to the right Water moving south in the southern hemisphere deflects to the east always to the left Ekman Spiral Coriolis effect also influences vertical mixing by the Ekman spiral Wind can mix the surface layer in a stratified water column to a maximum of about 100 m Figure 1.13 Winds On a global scale, winds are directional and tend to be steady at various latitudes Winds move surface waters and push water to generate prevailing currents Northeast trade winds - from 0 o- 30 o N; push water southwest, toward the equator Fig 1.11...
View Full Document

This note was uploaded on 09/13/2010 for the course BIOL 4262 taught by Professor Stickle during the Spring '10 term at LSU.

Page1 / 34

1-2 Ocean Currents & Climate - OCEAN CIRCULATION...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 10. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online