2-1 Larval Ecology

2-1 Larval Ecology - Larval Ecology: Chapter 1, pages 25-31...

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Larval Ecology: Chapter 1, pages 25-31
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Larval Ecology: Larvae of marine animals are morphologically diverse (some bizarre) produced by holoplankton, nekton and benthic invertebrates (meroplankton) First metazoans were probably spawners with larval dispersal
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Echinopluteus Larvae
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Nauplius Larvae: Crustaceans
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Serpulid Trocophore Side View
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Nepthyid larvae– various stages
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W. Garstang The trochophores are larval tops the polychaetes set spinning With just a ciliated ring, at least in the beginning. They feed and feel an urgent need to grow more like their mothers, So sprout some segments on behind, first one and then the others.
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And since more weight demands more power, each segment has to bring Its contribution in an extra locomotive ring. With these the larva swims with ease, and, adding extra segments more, Becomes a polytrochula instead of a trochophore. Then setose bundles sprout and grow and the sequel can’t be hid: The larva fails to pull its weight and sinks, an Annelid
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Meroplankton and Benthic Invertebrates: Larvae have a biological clock, and must settle Larvae of some species delay settlement and some become less choosy over time Time in plankton is variable (most from hrs - days but months and trans-oceanic transport possible)
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Where do larvae settle? In standing water, larvae are very selective physical conditions, presence of adults (gregarious settlement), microbial coatings and chemical signals are used as cues In moving water, studies are conducted in flumes Most species are not selective even though adults appear to be
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Development patterns of Benthic Invertebrates 1) Planktonic with broadcast dispersal Offspring released as meroplanktonic larvae
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This note was uploaded on 09/13/2010 for the course BIOL 4262 taught by Professor Stickle during the Spring '10 term at LSU.

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2-1 Larval Ecology - Larval Ecology: Chapter 1, pages 25-31...

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