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7-Teleostomi - AdvancedJawed Fishes:Part1 Teleostomes...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style  9/14/10 Advanced Jawed  Fishes: Part 1 Teleostomes: Acanthodii & Lecture 7: Chap 11, DOF
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 9/14/10 SlingJAW WRASSE http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XgXQyMI4A http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQucKIv6NM0&f
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 9/14/10 Carbonif erous Camels often sit down carefully, perhaps their joints creak rec ent Persistent early oiling might prevent perennial rust
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 9/14/10 mnemonic devices PERIODS (PALEOZOIC,  MESOZOIC) Cambrian  540 to 505 mya Ordovician  505 to 438 mya Silurian  438 to 408 mya Devonian  408 to 360 mya Carboniferous  360 to 280  mya Permian  280 to 248 mya Triassic  248 to 208 mya Jurassic  208 to 146 mya Cretaceous 146 to 65 mya EPOCHS (CENOZOIC) Paleocene  65-54 mya Eocene  54-38 mya Oligocene  38-24 mya Miocene  24-5 mya Pliocene  5-1.8 mya
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 9/14/10 Advanced Jawed Fished 1:  Bonyfishes - Teleostomes Bony fishes first appear in the fossil record in  the Late Ordovician  Teleostomes composed of three classes  Acanthodians  Sarcopterygians Actinopterygians }   Euteleostomi       (Osteichthyes)
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Click to edit Master subtitle style  9/14/10 BONY FISH:  98% OF ALL  LIVING  VERTEBRATES  ARE MEMBERS OF  TELEOSTOMI  (MANY NOT IN THE  WATER) AND ALL  VERTEBRATES  EXCEPT 
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 9/14/10
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 9/14/10 Class Acanthodii† 
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Class Acanthodii†  “Spiny sharks”, but not sharks Small salt and freshwater fishes (<20cm to 2.5m) Large eyes Flexible bodies covered with bony, rhombic scales  Heavy spines in front of the fins.  An opercular series covering the gills  3 orders, 9 families, 60 genera known
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 9/14/10
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 9/14/10 Outlasted Ostracoderms by 100 
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 9/14/10 Trends in Acanthodii Early forms had multiple gill covers, broad  unembedded spines anterior to all fins except  the caudal and between the pectoral and  pelvic fins Advanced forms with a single gill cover,  ancillary paired spines are lost, other spines  became smaller and embedded in  musculature Some specialized forms were toothless with  long gill rakers (likely planktivorous)
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 9/14/10 Why are Acanthodii  considered advanced  Have synapomorphies only seen in other  advanced gnathostomes including:  Three semicircular canals Otoliths Neural and haemal arches with the unrestricted  vertebral column Lateral line canals Ossified operculum Branchiostegals
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 9/14/10 Semicircular Canals
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