2008 - SEXUAL Harassment Maas et all Harassing increased...

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SEXUAL Harassment Maas et all Harassing increased gender identification Men who are less "masculine" are less likely to harass Men who harassed felt more masculine after harassing How do most people respond to harassment Majority ignore it Wodzicka and LaFrance Participants recruited for job interview Interviewer asked harassing vs bizarre questions Less than 40% responded in ANY way (verbal/nonverbal) Only about 10% responded directly saying behavior was inappropriate When surveyed as to how might respond to same situation, 90% report they would take direct action Small percentage report to supervisors 1/3 who do report say it made things worse Consequences Costs for victims but more data is needed to determine exactly what the effects are Productivity, promotions, education, physical and mental health outcomes Costs for employers Productivity, turnover, reputation What should you do if you are harassed 1. You must protest, if you do not protest it is not harassment, there needs to be no ambiguity in your response
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2008 - SEXUAL Harassment Maas et all Harassing increased...

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