Ch_17_Lecture - Key Questions: What characterized...

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Key Questions: What characterized continuity and change between the Old South and the New South? What were the origins and nature of southern populism? What were women’s role in the South? How and why did segregation and disfranchisement change race relations in the South?
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The Newness of the New South An industrial and urban South The “newness” of the New South concerned the economy, especially the rise of industry and a corresponding urbanization. Birmingham, Alabama epitomized the one aspect of the New South as iron and steel mills emerged in the city.The southern textile industry also grew, especially in the Piedmont. The tobacco and soft drink industries also became important economic aspects of the South. Southern railroad construction boomed in the 1880s, tying the section together and stimulating the rise of interior cities. Map: Railroads in the South, 1859, p. 534 Map: Railroads in the South, 1899, p. 535.
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The Newness of the New South, cont’d. The limits of industrial and urban growth Southern urban and industrial growth was rapid but barely kept pace with the northern boom. A weak agricultural economy and high rural birthrate kept wages in the South low and undermined the southern economy. Consumer demand was low limiting the market for southern manufacturing goods. Low wages also had other negative effects, including keeping immigrants away. The South remained a section apart. The Civil War had wiped out its capital resources, making it a colony of the North. Investment seemed riskier making the South dependent on numerous small investors.
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cont’d. Farms to cities: impact on southern society Industrialization had a huge impact on the South. Failed farmers moved to textile villages but by 1900, almost one-third of the textile mill work force were children under fourteen and women. Between 1880 and 1900, the gap between rural and
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This note was uploaded on 09/14/2010 for the course HIST 1302 taught by Professor Williams during the Summer '10 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Ch_17_Lecture - Key Questions: What characterized...

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