hotwar_coldwar - Unit 18 Hot war, cold war: why did the...

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Unit 18 Hot war, cold war: why did the major twentieth-century conflicts affect so many people? History Year 9 About the unit In this unit pupils learn about the main conflicts of the twentieth century by identifying key ideas and themes and making links and connections, particularly between the First World War, the Second World War and the Cold War. The unit focuses on the widespread impact of these conflicts through the examination of specific events, the personal experiences of individuals and a wide range of visual and written sources. This unit is expected to take 10– 15 hours . Where the unit fits in This unit builds upon work that pupils have done on earlier units that deal with conflict, such as in unit 5 ‘Elizabeth I’, unit 8 ‘The civil wars’ and unit 14 ‘The British Empire’. It is intended to serve two purposes: first, to ‘set the scene’ for more detailed studies to follow for pupils who opt for History at GCSE; and second, to act as a ‘rounding-off unit’ for pupils who do not wish to continue with History at GCSE. It is suggested that this unit could be linked with unit 19 ‘The Holocaust’ and unit 22 ‘The role of the individual’. Links could be made with unit 9I ‘Energy and electricity’ in the science scheme of work. Expectations At the end of this unit most pupils will: demonstrate an outline knowledge of twentieth-century conflicts; analyse the conflicts, making links and connections between them; relate events, changes and the experiences of individuals to the wider picture; use a range of sources for information, analysis, organisation and communication; describe and begin to analyse why there are different interpretations of events; select, organise and use relevant information to provide structured work, making appropriate use of dates and terms some pupils will not have made so much progress and will: demonstrate knowledge of twentieth-century conflicts; describe aspects of the different conflicts; be aware of individual stories, but find it harder to make appropriate links and connections to the wider picture; describe and begin to analyse why there are different interpretations of events; select information from a limited number of sources; show some understanding of why the past has been represented and interpreted in different ways; produce structured work, making appropriate use of dates and terms some pupils will have progressed further and will: use a wide range of appropriate technical vocabulary when demonstrating knowledge of the conflicts; analyse the relationship between the major conflicts; display shrewd understanding of the limitations of sources; explain why different interpretations of events have been produced; select, organise and use relevant information to produce a well-structured answer to the enquiry question, making appropriate use of dates and terms Prior learning It is helpful if pupils have: • compared the nature and impact of conflicts in previous units, as in unit 6 ‘Islamic
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This note was uploaded on 09/14/2010 for the course HIS 12001 taught by Professor Vincentlee during the Fall '10 term at St.Francis College.

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hotwar_coldwar - Unit 18 Hot war, cold war: why did the...

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