World History Course Guide 4.08

World History Course Guide 4.08 - World History and World...

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World History and World Cultures Course Curriculum Map Social Studies Department Mercer Island High School
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Topics of Study Early Man and Early Civilizations Ancient Greece Ancient Roman Republic and Empire World Religions The Middle-Ages Renaissance and Reformation The Scientific Revolution and the Age of Exploration Enlightenment and Revolution Industrialization and the New Modern World Nationalism, Imperialism, Militarism, and Alliances World War I and the Russian Revolution World War II and the Holocaust
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Early Man and Early Civilizations Central Focus/Essential Questions : How did the Agricultural Revolution fundamentally change life for human beings? What have been the advantages and disadvantages of that shift? How did the Agricultural Revolution lead to Civilization? How can civilization be defined? What comparisons can be made between various early civilizations, both eastern and western? Themes: Culture Cultural Relativism Civilization Civilized and Uncivilized Religion Early Government Social Stratification Gender Inequality Possible Topics: Hunting and Gathering Agricultural Revolution Geography—the River Valley Development of writing Hammurabi’s Code Egypt China India Mesopotamia/Ancient Middle East Confucianism Daoism Legalism Reading Assignments : Textbook: World History: Connections to Today, Ellis and Esler: Chapters 1-4 Possible Secondary Source Selections: Hunting and Gathering and the Emergence of Agriculture (reading) Of Headhunters and Soldiers, Rosaldo Ilongot Headhunting, Olivariez Cultural Relativism and Universal Human Rights, Fleur-Lobban Guns, Germs, and Steel, Jared Diamond (selections) Mummification (National Geographic) A Thoroughly Modern Process (Archeology Magazine) Foot-binding (article) Civil Service Exams in China (article) Possible Primary Source Document Selections: Hammurabi’s Code Gilgamesh Possible Media Resource Selections : The God’s Must Be Crazy (motion picture) Lascaux Cave website Evolution (Walter Cronkite) Mesopotamia (time life) Secrets of the Pharos (National Geographic) Ancient China (Time Life) Pyramids (PBS)
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Ancient Greece Central Focus/Essential Questions : Why is Ancient Greece widely regarded as the Cradle of Western Civilization? What have been Greece’s greatest legacies? Themes: Art and Architecture—the search for the perfect form Greek Geography and the Polis Philosophy From Monarchy to Democracy, governmental evolution Free Speech Greek Myth Possible Topics: Socrates Plato Aristotle The Parthenon Oedipus Rex Homer Iliad Odyssey The Polis Athens vs. Sparta Peloponnesian War Trojan War Reading Assignments : Textbook: World History: Connections to Today, Ellis and Esler: Chapter 5 Possible Secondary Source Selections: The Polis, Kitto When Free Speech Was First Condemned, Stone Greek vs. Greek The Socratic Method The Peloponnesian War Possible Primary Source Document Selections: Oedipus Rex (selections) The Iliad (selections) The Odyssey (selections)
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This note was uploaded on 09/14/2010 for the course HIS 12001 taught by Professor Vincentlee during the Fall '10 term at St.Francis College.

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World History Course Guide 4.08 - World History and World...

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