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SE571_Course_Project_Writing_Tips - SE571 Principles of...

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  SE571 Principles of Information Security and Privacy Course Project Writing Tips Course projects cause many students anxiety. Some anxiety is probably healthy; it means you want to do a good job. But too much anxiety usually interferes with performance. Here are some tips you may want to consider as you plan and create your course project. 1. Read the Course Project Requirements and the Course Project Sample Template (in Doc Sharing) early. Here’s why: if you have in mind the required specifications of the assignment as you start the weekly assignments and other activities, you’ll be able to recognize when you come across information that you might want to use in your project. 2. Keep a separate project notebook. Don’t worry about keeping it highly organized and documented; just jot down ideas as they come to you. You’ll be surprised how much anxiety you prevent by simply having ideas ready when you sit down to write. 3. Use the “mull” method. (You won’t find the Mull Method in any book on writing.) This means spend a few days mulling over the assignment. Don’t force yourself to think about it but, if you’ve read over the project requirements and have your project notebook with you as you do your regular class activities and your regular daily activities, your brain will work on the assignment all by itself. As it does so, more ideas will come to you and all you have to do is jot them down. 4. Don’t try to write the paper from the beginning to the end correctly the first time. If you do, you’ll probably forget all kinds of things and your sentence structure and word choice, not to mention spelling and grammar, will likely not be as good as it should be. Don’t edit as you write. Just write. That way the ideas can come out with less effort. Edit later. 5. Use your text to help you get ideas. For example, when considering vulnerabilities, check the index at the back of the text for the word “vulnerabilities” and browse through those pages. When you’re designing the network, look through The chapter on security in networks.
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