14 Vocab - The Industrial Revolution 1750 to 1850

14 Vocab - The Industrial Revolution 1750 to 1850 - Chapter...

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Chapter 14: The Industrial Revolution Individuals Richard Awkwright : was an entrepreneur who encouraged the inventors like Kay, Crompton and Cartwright. He patented their ideas and financed
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their projects but most importantly he created the cotton mill which brought the production processes together in a factory, where he developed the use of power – first horse power, then water power and finally steam power – to make cotton manufacture a
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mechanized industry. Alexander Graham Bell invented the telephone in 1876. Jeremy Bentham was the greatest advocate of Utilitarianism and argued for individual freedom, separation of church and state, equal
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rights for women, the right to divorce and the end of slavery. He believed that individual freedom guaranteed happiness. Henry Bessemer : built a refined blast furnace in 1856 known as the Bessemer converter , which made steel
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production cheaper and more efficient than ever before. In turn machinery and tools became better and cheaper than ever before Otto von Bismarck , the German chancellor who brought about the unification of Germany, also proved to be a most
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surprising Evolutionary Socialist, (well, sort of!) when he introduced medical insurance, unemployment compensation and retirement pensions for German workers. Bismarck was not a proponent of Liberalism but, like Robert Owen, he understood that
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secure workers make more productive workers and his reforms greatly increased German industrial output. Robert Blackwell was an English agriculturalist who bred stronger horses and fatter sheep and cattle
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Edmund Cartwright : was a clergyman without technical training who invented a power loom in 1785. The power loom greatly speeded up the weaving process. Henry Cort introduced a new puddling process
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in 1784 which allowed more impurities to be removed from the molten iron this making a stronger product. Samuel Crompton : in 1779 invented “ the Mule ” which could turn out higher quality thread at a speed 100 times faster speed than any
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worker with a spinning wheel. It meant that high quality thread could be produced faster than weavers could make the thread (weave the thread) into cloth. In 1790 the Mule was adapted to steam power. Abraham Darby : was a Iron Smelter who in
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1709 introduced the Blast Furnace which dramatically lowered the price of iron making. By the nineteenth century the industry had become so efficient that steel (which was much stronger and resilient) could be produced in greater quantities than iron.
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Thomas Alva Edison used electricity in his remarkable invention the incandescent light, or the light bulb James Hargreaves invented the Spinning Jenney in 1764. The Jenny was a multi spool weaving machine
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Shuttle, speeded up the weaving process. Michael Faraday
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This note was uploaded on 09/14/2010 for the course HISTORY History 13 taught by Professor Kamber during the Fall '10 term at Glendale Community College.

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14 Vocab - The Industrial Revolution 1750 to 1850 - Chapter...

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