25Hayes_et_al.(2002) - Hermaphroditic, demasculinized frogs...

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Unformatted text preview: Hermaphroditic, demasculinized frogs after exposure to the herbicide atrazine at low ecologically relevant doses Tyrone B. Hayes*, Atif Collins, Melissa Lee, Magdelena Mendoza, Nigel Noriega, A. Ali Stuart, and Aaron Vonk Laboratory for Integrative Studies in Amphibian Biology, Group in Endocrinology, Museum of Vertebrate Zoology, Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3140 Communicated by David B. Wake, University of California, Berkeley, CA, March 1, 2002 (received for review December 20, 2001) Atrazine is the most commonly used herbicide in the U.S. and probably the world. It can be present at several parts per million in agricultural runoff and can reach 40 parts per billion (ppb) in precipitation. We examined the effects of atrazine on sexual development in African clawed frogs ( Xenopus laevis ). Larvae were exposed to atrazine (0.01200 ppb) by immersion throughout larval development, and we examined gonadal histology and laryngeal size at metamorphosis. Atrazine ( > 0.1 ppb) induced hermaphroditism and demasculinized the larynges of exposed males ( > 1.0 ppb). In addition, we examined plasma testosterone levels in sexually mature males. Male X. laevis suffered a 10-fold decrease in testosterone levels when exposed to 25 ppb atrazine. We hypothesize that atrazine induces aromatase and promotes the conversion of testosterone to estrogen. This disruption in steroi- dogenesis likely explains the demasculinization of the male larynx and the production of hermaphrodites. The effective levels re- ported in the current study are realistic exposures that suggest that other amphibian species exposed to atrazine in the wild could be at risk of impaired sexual development. This widespread com- pound and other environmental endocrine disruptors may be a factor in global amphibian declines. I n the last 10 years, a great deal of attention has focused on the global presence of endocrine-disrupting contaminants in the environment (1, 2). Similarly, a great deal of attention has focused on global amphibian declines (3, 4). In the case of amphibian declines, efforts focus on identifying causes (5), whereas for endocrine disruptors, the causes have been iden- tified and studies focus on identifying effects of endocrine disruptors in the environment (611). Atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethytlamino-6-isopropylamine-1,3,5- triazine) is the most commonly used herbicide in the U.S. and probably the world. The U.S. Department of Agriculture reports that more than 30,000 tons (60 million pounds) are used annually in the U.S. alone (12). Atrazine has been used for over 40 years and currently it is used in more than 80 countries. Despite its widespread intensive use, atrazine is considered safe because of its short half-life and negligible bioaccumulation and biomagni- fication (13). Also, atrazine seems to have very few effects on adults and reportedly induces abnormalities and deformities only at very high doses. As a result of the high doses required toat very high doses....
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25Hayes_et_al.(2002) - Hermaphroditic, demasculinized frogs...

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