Drama 103 Chapter 2 - CHAPTER 02 2.1.1 Preparing to Read and Analyze a Play \u25cf Shakepeare\u2019s actors did not have copies of the entire play but

Drama 103 Chapter 2 - CHAPTER 02 2.1.1 Preparing to...

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CHAPTER 02 2.1.1 Preparing to Read and Analyze a Play Shakepeare’s actors did not have copies of the entire play, but only sides (pages that include only their lines and cues → the preceding lines that would tell actors when to say their lines) Printed text for plays didn’t exist until printing press became a thing (led to studying play texts, etc) 2.1.2 Approaches to Play Analysis All readings have interpretations → need to support analysis of any play text with evidence from text Steps to analyze text more effectively: Sit down and read play in one setting, take short breaks between the acts Notice the item: can include clues (so can recurring images, words, objects) Read cast of characters and information given about them Read stage directions, can help you imagine what play might look like on stage Think of play as constructed of actions, not words, and visualize those actions Read a play more than once. Use the first time though to get sense of while, and later on read for detailed analysis Remember that text is only skeleton of production The Narysastra or Natya Sastra is an ancient Sanskrit text attributed to Bharata Muni. Is early description and analysis of influence on Indian drama Zeami Motokiyo’s Fushikaden is first known treatise on Japanese Noh drama Aristotle’s Poetics is earliest surviving work of dramatic theory in the West Poetrics includes six characteristics: plot, character, thought, diction, music, and spectacle 2.2.1 Plot Plot is both the story told in play and meaningful arrangement of those events Most common structure is referred to as “climactic” cause-to-effect or Aristotelian structure → common for narrative film and TV. Broken into the following: Point of attack: moment in larger story at which playwright chooses to begin the play. Plays with climatic structure usually have late point of attack, thus a lot of exposition Exposition: information about events that occurred before start of play, and the identity and relationships of the characters, and about present situation → can happen throughout the play, but is most often found in the beginning. Point of attack determines amount of exposition required Inciting incident: occurrence that sets dramatic action of the play in motion → incident usually leads to primary question or issue the play revolves around Rising action: intensification of the dramatic action, leading logically to climax: Rising action includes complications (new elements that alter direction of action), discoveries (revelations of new information, opposition to a plan, identity of a character), reversals (points at which action suddenly
turns in a completely different direction, or does a 180) Climax: moment of crisis when original question of the play must be answers → leads to denouement Denouement: resolution of falling action → loose ends are tied up, all questions answered, and tension caused by action is released Episodic play structures (instead of linear cause-to-effect arrangement), the incidents

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