Don Sabo - Masculinities and Men's Health-Moving Toward Post-Superman Era Prevention

Don Sabo - Masculinities and Men's Health-Moving Toward Post-Superman Era Prevention

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Masculinities and Men's Health: Moving Toward Post-Superman Era Prevention ~ering or perhaps resur- en. One does not escape )iography one is at least 'ject's own psychic real- 'awn on in a variety of 1estic world and other nininity. York: Harper and Row, Press, 1984), p. 28. dily Attractiveness for Y in Freud's Dora," in '-Hysteria-Feminism GENDER DIFFERENCES IN HEALTH AND ILLNESS ins central to the anti- rtherine MacKinnon). y, Susan Brownmiller, 'eminist interest in the :eminism oriented to- inism and Foucault: Re- Mortality From the time of conception, men are more likely to succumb to prenatal and neonatal death than females. Men's chances of dying during the prenatal stage of development are about 12% greater than those of females and, during the neona- tal (newborn) stage, 130% greater than those of females. A number of neonatal dis- orders are common to males but not females, such as bacterial infections, respira- tory illness, digestive diseases, and some circulatory disorders of the aorta and pulmonary artery. Table 1 compares male and female infant mortality rates across historical time. Though the infant mortality rate decreases over time, the persist- ence of the higher rates for males than females suggests that biological factors may be operating. Data also show that males have higher mortality rates than females in every age category, from "under one year" through "over 85" (National Center for Health Statistics, 1992). In fact, men are more likely to die in 9 out of the 10 leading causes of death in the United States. (See Table 2.) t Culture (Cambridge: 327 DONSABO Masculinities and Men 's Health: Moving
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The Gendered Body Table 1. Infant Mortality Rate Year Both Sexes Males Females 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1989 47.0 29.2 26.0 20.0 12.6 9.8 52.5 32.8 29.3 22.4 13.9 10.8 41.3 25.5 22.6 17.5 11.2 8.8 Note: Rates are for infant (under 1 year) deaths per 1,000 live births for all races. Source: Adapted from Monthly Vital Statistics Report, Vol. 40, No.8. Supplement 2, January 7, 1992, p. 41. Table 2. Death Rates by Sex and 10 leading Causes: 1989 Age-Adjusted Death Rate per 100,000 Population Cause of Death Total Male Female Sex Differential 155.9 133.0 33.8 28.0 8.9 11.5 11.3 9.4 210.2 163.4 49.5 30.4 12.8 2.0 18.6 14.7 112.3 111.7 18.9 26.2 5.5 11.0 4.5 4.1 1.87 1.45 2.62 1.16 2.33 1.09 4.13 3.59 Diseases of the heart Malignant neoplasms Accidents and adverse effects Cerebrovascular disease Chronic liver disease, cirrhosis Diabetes Suicide Homicide and legal intervention 328
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Masculinities and Men's Health: Moving Toward Post-Superman Era Prevention slowed by increasing mortality from coronary heart disease and lung cancer that were, in turn, mainly due to higher rates of cigarette smoking among males. The most recent trends show that differences between women's and men's
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Don Sabo - Masculinities and Men's Health-Moving Toward Post-Superman Era Prevention

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