Mod1Session2-Religion

Mod1Session2-Religion - Module I Session 2 “Religion”...

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Module I Session 2 “Religion”
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2. "Religion" Etymology of the Word Common definitions existential: ordering of one’s existence or way of life to spiritual reality (gods, God, spirit, cosmos) psychologically interpretative: focus on religious experience sociologically interpretative: sets of religious practices, beliefs, and institutions religious: human response to the divine reality and power defining all reality
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“Religion” - Language Latin ROOT of religio is a verb legere (to gather together, to spell letters) Derivative meaning of legere #1: relegere = to reread, give careful consideration From Cicero, “De natura deorum II, xxviii: “Those who carefully took in hand all things pertaining to the gods were called religiosi , from relegere .”
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“Religion” - Language Latin ROOT of religio is a verb legere Derivative meaning of legere #2: religare = to bind oneself back with piety to God From Lactanius, “Divine Institutes” IV, xxviii: “We are tied to God and bound to Him [ religati ] by the bond of piety, and it is from this, and not as Cicero holds, from careful considerations [ relegendo ], that religion has received its name.” From St. Augustine, The City of God , X, iii: “Having lost God through neglect, we recover Him [ religentes ] and are drawn to Him.” (The emphasis is on recovering God after sin.) And St. Augustine, in Retractions I, xiii, accepts Lactanius’s definition above: “Religion binds us [ religat ] to the one Almighty God.” (The emphasis here is on being subject to an immutable and unmoving order.) St. Thomas Aquinas, Summa , II-II, Ql xxxi, a1: accepts all three derivations of religion without opting for one. But the Most correct seems to be the one from Lactanius, the second one above from Augustine.
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“Religion” sacred or holy vs. secular or worldly Both religious and secular outlook affirms that human life as we know it is marked by dukkha (unhappiness), or fallenness (original- inherited or accrued-social sin). All religions, just as do social theorists and activists espouse some hope in liberation from needless suffering. Secular existence as we know it is subject to maya (illusion), hence spiritually speaking, secular or worldly liberation is incomplete.
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Mod1Session2-Religion - Module I Session 2 “Religion”...

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