Guide to Building a Project Management Office

Guide to Building a Project Management Office - Guide to...

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an Project Management eBook Guide to Buildinga Project Management Office
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1 contents This content was adapted from Internet.com's CIO Update Web site. Contributors George Hunte, Chris Craig-Jones, Haydn Thomas and Julie Tilke are courtesy of Computer Associates. Guide to Building a Project Management Office, an Internet.com Project Management eBook. © 2008, Jupitermedia Corp. 2 Getting Your Project Management Office Off the Ground George Hunte 4 Introducing a Project Management Office Into YourOrganization George Hunte 8 Evolving the Maturity Level of Your Project Management Office Chris Craig-Jones 11 Increasing PMO Maturity Through Multiple Releases Chris Craig-Jones 14 Project Management Best Practices: An Introduction to PMBOK & PRINCE 2 Haydn Thomas and Julie Tilke 17 Project Management Best Practices: An Introduction to COBIT Haydn Thomas and Julie Tilke Guide to Building a Project Management Office [] 2 4 8 11 14 17
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T oday , organizations spenda largeamountof theirtime delivering projects.Whilesuccessrateshave improved toapprox imately34 percent,15percentof allprojects stillfailand51percentaresomehow"challenged,"accord- ing to research from theStandishGroup. There are many reasons why projects fail — many of which can be attributed to a lack of visibility into long- term project needs. Without prop- er visibility, organizations are unable to see what is needed six months, three months, or even two months down the road, result- ing in poorly constructed project plans that do not capture critical dependencies, including assigning project resources and key mile- stones. While developing a software process improvement program can be costly, studies have shown that the resulting benefits of improved time-to-market, productivity,and software quality far outweigh the initial investment costs. Establishing a project management office (PMO) is the first step towards improving: • Project, program and portfolio management best practices; • Time-to-market acceleration;and • The quality of your initiatives in a cost-effective manner. Getting Your PMO Started The first step to establishing a PMO is to determine your organization's needs. Start by examiningthe key processes in the areas of project, portfolio,and program managementas defined, for example, by the Project Management Institute's (PMI's) PPM/PMO framework. This framework has three levels (project, program,and portfolio), each of which is broken down into 12 process groups (e.g., project initiation, project planning, etc.). The process groups consist of 92 processes in total, and these processes relate to the manage- ment of nine knowledge areas (e.g., scope, cost, time, and resources, etc.). Examples of PMI processes/components include a project charter, project plan, work breakdown schedules and cost estimate.
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Guide to Building a Project Management Office - Guide to...

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