Chem 3AL Lab Report 6 - Experiment 9 What Do You Take for...

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Experiment 9 – What Do You Take for Pain? Date: 4/13/10 Discussion Part of being able to successfully isolate the chemical compound naproxen, is being able to apply common principles of acid-base chemistry to its common over-the-counter analgesic, Aleve. Originally present in a solid salt form, sodium naproxen in Aleve must first be dissolved in heated water, as noted in Part I of the experiment. This influences the dissociation of sodium ions with naproxen’s conjugate base. Once carried out, all other solid impurities, designated as undesired material, should then be removed by means of centrifugation and filtration. With these initial steps applied, what is left in solution is the dissociated salt of naproxen – sodium ions and naproxen’s conjugate base. The addition of sulfuric acid causes an acid-base reaction to occur with the product being that of the free acid of naproxen. Because of naproxen’s insolubility in cold water, a solid form of the compound precipitates out. A simple square-tip Pasteur-pipette was used to extract the liquid and retrieve the desired product. Centrifugation was also applied to ensure that all naproxen’s base reacted with sulfuric acid, as to come up with the highest percent recovery possible. To recrystallize naproxen, a co-solvent system of water and ethanol was used in this
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Chem 3AL Lab Report 6 - Experiment 9 What Do You Take for...

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