Chapter05 - Chapter 5: Server Hardware and Availability...

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Chapter 5: Server Hardware and Availability
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Hardware Reliability and LAN The more reliable a component, the more expensive it is. Server hardware is more expensive than desktop workstation hardware as it needs to be more reliable. If a workstation fails, one person is inconvenienced. If a server fails, many people are inconvenienced. Servers need to be as powerful as possible as many people can be using them at once.
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Hot Swappable A hot swappable device is one which can be replaced whilst the server is still in operation. You should only hot swap components when the component and operating system supports it. The following components can be hot swapped: RAM, disk drive, power supply, NIC, graphics cards. Hot swappable components are more expensive. Often only necessary when you need to keep a server operational 24/7. Most organizations can tolerate a server being offline after hours for maintenance.
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Multiple Power Supplies Multiple power supplies can allow a server to function after one power supply fails. Power supplies are the component most likely to fail in a server. They are also one of the cheapest components. Having multiple power supplies doesn’t mean you can hot swap. In many cases it will allow you to keep your server running until you can choose the right time to power down and replace the failed component.
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UPS Stands for U ninterruptible P ower S upply. A battery that allows a server to remain functional when there is a loss of mains electricity. Battery also used when power fluctuates to provide a stable current to the server. Brownouts occur more often than blackouts and can do just as much damage. Most operating systems can be configured to gracefully shut down once the server shifts to battery power.
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Asymmetric Multiprocessing Where special processors can be delegated specific tasks by the operating system. Graphics cards are an example. Graphics processing occurs on the graphics card’s processor rather than the computer’s CPU.
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Symmetric multiprocessing involves having several processors of the same make and model working in parallel. Tasks are balanced across all processors.
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This note was uploaded on 09/19/2010 for the course LAN 237898 taught by Professor Johns during the Fall '10 term at Allen County Comm College.

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Chapter05 - Chapter 5: Server Hardware and Availability...

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