Cap-K-UMKC - UMKC SDI '9 Cap K Cap K C AP 1NC (1/3) Social...

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Unformatted text preview: UMKC SDI '9 Cap K Cap K C AP 1NC (1/3) Social Services serve capitalist society by maintaining social order and economic security for elites Gill, 98 [David D. Gill, Professor of Social Policy University, Pennsylvania D.S.W and University of Pennsylvania M.S.W., Confronting injustice and oppression Pg. 72- 74, 1998, (Google books)] The poverty and social illfare of growing numbers of landless, homeless, unemployed workers, and vagrant beggars came to be widely perceived as a social problem threatening "law and order" and requiring public intervention, based on legislation , rather than spontaneous, voluntary, charitable acts by individuals, religious congregations, and citizens' associations. Traditional amelioration was, there-fore, withheld, by law, from "able bodied" poor people of working age, who were defined as undeserving poor, and was available only to people who were defined as deserving poor," such as widows and their young children, old and sick people, and people with disabilities, i.e., people who were not expected to support themselves through their own labor (Katz 1989). Since the early stages of capitalism in England, a key feature of public assistance has been to defend and conserve the societal status quo, by dealing with symptoms of systemic ill-fare rather than with its causes in the fabric of society. This approach reflects misconceptions concerning causes and effects. Poverty and dependency were assumed to result from attributes of poor people rather than from social, economic, political, and cultural dynamics; and helping poor people was assumed to perpetuate their poverty . Lack of employment opportunities was typically overlooked, and when it was acknowledged occasionally no effective measures were taken to deal with it. Instead, able-bodied people who did not find work, were punished, stigmatized, and forced into workhouses, as if unemployment was their fault. The principle of using public assistance to control the involvement forced into workhouses, as if unemployment was their fault. The principle of using public assistance to control the involvement of undeserving poor people in societys work system were brought to the American colonies by the early settlers. lt has continued to influence the administration of financial assistance and social services on local, state, and federal levels in the United States to the end of the twentieth century. To understand the evolution and current dynamics of public assistance and social services in this country, it is, therefore, necessary to take into account the enduring influence of the control dimension of the English Poor Laws, and of the mentality underlying them. Adaptation: The control dimension of social services originated, quite fittingly, in the culture of early capitalism, in the traditional, class-conscious, hierarchic English society, on a settled and populous island . The adaptation" dimension, on the other hand, evolved, equally liltingly, in a society of immigrants, on a vast, thinly settled, under populated continent, richly endowed by nature. This society had evolved an other hand, evolved, equally liltingly, in a society of immigrants, on a vast, thinly settled, under populated continent, richly endowed by nature....
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Cap-K-UMKC - UMKC SDI '9 Cap K Cap K C AP 1NC (1/3) Social...

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