Lesson 18 - Module 7 Knowledge Representation and...

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Module 7 Knowledge Representation and Logic – (Rule based Systems) Version 1 CSE IIT, Kharagpur
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Lesson 18 Rule based Systems - II Version 1 CSE IIT, Kharagpur
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7.2.5 Programs in PROLOG These minimal notes on Prolog show only some of its flavor. Here are facts plays(ann,fido). friend(john,sam). where ann, fido, john, and sam are individuals, and plays and friend are functors . And here is a rule likes(X,Y) :- plays(X,Y),friend(X,Y). It says that if X plays with Y and X is a friend of Y then X likes Y. Variables start with capital letters (If we are not interested in the value of a variable, we can just use _ (underscore)). In a rule the left-hand side and the right-hand side are called respectively the head and the tail of the rule. The prompt in prolog is | ?- You exit prolog with the statement halt. You can add rules and facts to the current session in a number of ways: 1. You can enter clauses from the terminal as follows: 2. | ?- consult(user). 3. | like(b,a). 4. | like(d,c). 5. ^D which adds the two clauses to the working space. 6. Or you can read in a file: 7. | ?- consult('filename'). which is added at the end of the working space. 8. Or you can assert a clause 9. | ?- assert(< clause >). 10. Here are some confusing "equalities" in prolog: Version 1 CSE IIT, Kharagpur
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variable arithmetic predicate relation substitution computation ----------------------------------------------------------- == identical no no = unifiable yes no =:= same value no yes is is the yes yes value of and some examples of their use: ?- X == Y. no ?- X + 1 == 2 + Y. no ?- X + 1 = 2 + Y. X = 2 Y = 1 ?- X + 1 = 1 + 2. no Example: Factorial1 factorial(0,1). factorial(N,F) :- N>0, N1 is N-1, factorial(N1,F1),F is N*F1. then ?- factorial(5,F). F = 120 ?- factorial(X,120). instantiation error Example: Factorial2: dropping N>0 from factorial1 factorial(0,1). factorial(N,F) :- N1 is N-1, factorial(N1,F1),F is N*F1. then ?- factorial(5,F). F = 120; Here ";" asks for next value of F keeps on going until stack overflow Example: Factorial3: Changing order of terms (1) factorial(0,1). (2) factorial(N,F) :- factorial(N1,F1), N is N1+1, F is N*F1. Version 1 CSE IIT, Kharagpur
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then ?- factorial(5,F). F = 120 ?- factorial(X,120). X = 5; integer overflow Here is why factorial(X,120) returns 5. For brevity, instead of "factorial" we will write "f". f(X,120) / | / | [0/N5,1/F5,1/N4,1/F4,2/N3,2/F3,3/N2,6/F2,4/N1,24/F1,5/N1] / +-----------------------+ / | | | f(0,1) f(N1,F1) X is N1+1 6 is X*F1 / | / | [0/N5,1/F5,1/N4,1/F4,2/N3,2/F3,3/N2,6/F2,4/N1,24/F1] / +-----------------------+ / | | | f(0,1) f(N2,F2) N1 is N2+1 F1 is N1*F2 / | / | [0/N5,1/F5,1/N4,1/F4,2/N3,2/F3,3/N2,6/F2] / +-----------------------+
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This note was uploaded on 09/20/2010 for the course MCA DEPART 501 taught by Professor Hemant during the Fall '10 term at Institute of Computer Technology College.

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Lesson 18 - Module 7 Knowledge Representation and...

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