x86 - X86 Assembly Language Same Assembly Language for

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X86 Assembly Language Same Assembly Language for 8086,80286,80386,80486,Pentium I II, III, and IV Newer Processors add a few instructions but include all instructions from earlier processors
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CISC (X86) vs. RISC (MIPS,ARM) CISC machines have fewer registers CISC machines have more addressing modes – one operand can be memory (no LW or SW) CISC machines have more instruction formats and they vary in length CISC machines have more instructions Programs require fewer CISC instructions than RISC but time/instruction is longer With pipelining and dynamic execution, a CISC instruction set is perhaps 10-20% slower than RISC
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1978: The Intel 8086 is announced (16 bit architecture) 1980: The 8087 floating point coprocessor is added 1982: The 80286 increases address space to 24 bits, +instructions 1985: The 80386 extends to 32 bits, virtual memory & new addressing modes 1989-1995: The 80486, Pentium, Pentium Pro add a few instructions (mostly designed for higher performance)
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This note was uploaded on 09/21/2010 for the course ECE 4180 taught by Professor Staff during the Spring '08 term at Georgia Tech.

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x86 - X86 Assembly Language Same Assembly Language for

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