V-Tach.docx - 1 Running head VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA Ventricular Tachycardia Tristan Holland St Petersburg College EMS 1421 2 Running head VENTRICULAR

V-Tach.docx - 1 Running head VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA...

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1 Running head: VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA Ventricular Tachycardia Tristan Holland St. Petersburg College EMS 1421
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2 Running head: VENTRICULAR TACHYCARDIA Ventricular Tachycardia The heart is a muscular organ in the center of the chest that perpetuates blood flow through the entire body. Electrical impulses cause the heart to contract thousands of times a day keeping our bodies supplied with oxygenated blood carrying the nutrients it needs for survival. There are several dysrhythmia’s (abnormal heart beats) the heart can experience, with a portion of those being life-threatening. The dysrhythmia ventricular tachycardia is a rare condition that I encountered during my clinical rotations. The patient came to the emergency department with a chief complaint of lightheadedness, dizziness, jugular vein distention bilaterally, and “being able to see [his] heartbeat through his shirt.” An EKG was quickly applied to the patient which showed a pulse rate of 208 BPM, and the heart experiencing ventricular tachycardia, or v-tach. The patient was administered saline, 2g magnesium sulfate, and 100mcg of fentanyl via IV. The patient was then shocked with 100 joules, the heart rate dropped to only 192 bpm. 250 mcg of Esmolol was administered - no change seen. A shock of 150 joules was administered with no change seen. Two more shocks at 200 joules were given to the patient with no change seen to his condition. During each of these shocks, I was standing at the foot of the bed making eye contact with the patient, occasionally giving him needed encouragement. The defibrillation had failed to lower his pulse rate. It was silent for a few minutes until the doctor had thought to push 80mg of lidocaine. The patient’s BPM dropped to 82. The patient, who had a history of heart issues, was
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  • Fall '15
  • Cardiology, Cardiac arrest, ventricular tachycardia, Ventricular fibrillation

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