Lec35s - Part I Protein Structure th ed 313 366 6 th ed 319 380 7 8th ed 336 441 Part II Cancer th ed 368-371 6 7th ed 370-373 th ed 373-376 8

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Part I: Protein Structure 6 th ed.: 313, 366 7 th ed.: 319, 380 8 th ed.: 336, 441 Part II: Cancer 6 th ed.: 368-371 7 th ed.: 370-373 8 th ed.: 373-376
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Protein Structure Proteins can consist of separate domains that fold independently and may be encoded by separate exons. domain
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Each domain can contain different secondary structure elements. (Only protein backbone is shown!) α -helix β sheet domain domain in protein
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Domains can have independent functions enzyme activity binds another protein
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Proteins are mix-and- match combinations of different domains Protein #1 Protein #2 The same domain is often found in different proteins.
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The domain is not EXACTLY identical in the 2 proteins.
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The domain has the same overall 3D shape , but different amino acid sequence and slightly different structure in the two proteins.
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Exons can encode different domains
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Exon shuffling can rearrange domains in new combinations, making new genes
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2 examples of domains 1. SH2 domain ; binds phospho-tyrosine (P-Tyr) 2. Helix-turn-helix (HTH) domain; binds DNA
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Src has 3 domains: SH3, SH2, and kinase Schematic:
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SH3 domain : binds other proteins SH2 domain : binds P-Tyr kinase domain : phosphorylates proteins
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The Src SH2 domain can bind a P-Tyr on another protein another protein P-Tyr Src
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SH2 domain part of another protein phospho- Tyr X-ray crystallography reveals details of binding
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in many proteins. They all bind P-Tyr.
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This note was uploaded on 09/23/2010 for the course BIO 202 taught by Professor Dean during the Fall '08 term at SUNY Stony Brook.

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Lec35s - Part I Protein Structure th ed 313 366 6 th ed 319 380 7 8th ed 336 441 Part II Cancer th ed 368-371 6 7th ed 370-373 th ed 373-376 8

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