Week 4 - Analyzing Sentences and Style

Week 4 - Analyzing Sentences and Style - Week 4 Analyzing...

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Week 4 Analyzing Sentences and Style Unit 2 – Writing and Reading Critically
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Introduction Sentence “correctness” is crucial if you want to write effectively.  You must punctuate sentences correctly, choose words carefully, and  write sentences according to accepted rules of English grammar. You  must proofread sentences and strive for conciseness. You must master  basic sentence mechanics and understand how the parts of a sentence  – such as parts of speech, phrases, clauses, subjects, predicates, and  objects – work. In short, you must know how to write a sentence  correctly. 
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Introduction  However, “correctness” is not enough. As a junior in college, you  should have already mastered those skills. You were placed in this  class because of your existing writing skills; therefore, in this class we  will move beyond the basics and explore more advanced sentence  writing skills such as using figures of speech to accurately convey  meaning; varying your sentence types and structures to best reflect  your ideas; using subordination and coordination to enhance your style;  matching a sentence’s form with its meaning; using rhetorical strategies  to induce cooperation from your audience; and establishing rhythm,  pace, symmetry, balance, and sound in your prose. We want you to  move beyond “correctness” to establish an authoritative style that  captures your unique professional and academic voice.  
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Consider these questions for  reflection… What are the parts of a sentence? How does  a sentence assume form?  What is the essential function of a sentence?  How can I improve a sentence if it doesn’t  contain grammatical or punctuation errors  and is thus, essentially, “correct”?
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Questions for reflection What constitutes a writer’s style? My  writing style?  How is Barak Obama’s rhetorical style  different than John McCain’s? Al  Franken’s from Dennis Miller’s? Katie  Couric’s from Christian Amanpour’s?  
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Questions for reflection When is it appropriate to make a  deliberate mistake, such as a fragment,  in my writing? 
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From “ The Greatest Sentence ” by Martin Hill  Ortiz "Do you like sentences?" I can not think of a better  means to divide writers from non-writers. A writer will  immediately tremble and then recount favorite  sentences. A non-writer will be confused.  "Sentences? I like books. I like stories well-told. But  sentences?" This latter group stands in awe at the  dimensions of a cathedral. The former group is  thrilled by how the stacking of each brick  transgresses gravity as buttresses fly, defying the  heavens to create the heavenly.
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But first, a quick review of the  basics
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This note was uploaded on 09/23/2010 for the course WRIT 200 taught by Professor O'neil during the Spring '10 term at Arizona Western College.

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Week 4 - Analyzing Sentences and Style - Week 4 Analyzing...

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